Tag Archives: PLoS

Identifying the African Wintering Grounds of Hybrid Flycatchers Using a Multi-Isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Assignment Approach.

Identifying the African Wintering Grounds of Hybrid Flycatchers Using a Multi-Isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Assignment Approach.

PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e98075

Authors: Veen T, Hjernquist MB, Van Wilgenburg SL, Hobson KA, Folmer E, Font L, Klaassen M

Abstract
Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival, which would be expected if their migration strategy had been a mix of the parent species’ strategies potentially resulting in an intermediate route crossing the Sahara desert to different wintering grounds. Previously, we compared isotope ratios and found no significant difference in stable-nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) in winter-grown feathers between the parental species and hybrids, but stable-carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in hybrids significantly clustered only with those of pied flycatchers. We followed up on these findings and additionally analyzed the same feathers for stable-hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) and conducted spatially explicit multi-isotope assignment analyses. The assignment results overlapped with presumed wintering ranges of the two species, highlighting the efficacy of the method. In contrast to earlier findings, hybrids clustered with both parental species, though most strongly with pied flycatcher.

PMID: 24847717 [PubMed – in process]

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Guilt in bereavement: the role of self-blame and regret in coping with loss.

Guilt in bereavement: the role of self-blame and regret in coping with loss.
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e96606
Authors: Stroebe M, Stroebe W, van de Schoot R, Schut H, Abakoumkin G, Li J
Abstract
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S1P1 Receptor Modulation Preserves Vascular Function in Mesenteric and Coronary Arteries after CPB in the Rat Independent of Depletion of Lymphocytes.

S1P1 Receptor Modulation Preserves Vascular Function in Mesenteric and Coronary Arteries after CPB in the Rat Independent of Depletion of Lymphocytes.

PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e97196

Authors: Samarska IV, Bouma HR, Buikema H, Mungroop HE, Houwertjes MC, Absalom AR, Epema AH, Henning RH

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may induce systemic inflammation and vascular dysfunction. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) modulates various vascular and immune responses. Here we explored whether agonists of the S1P receptors, FTY720 and SEW2871 improve vascular reactivity after CPB in the rat.
METHODS: Experiments were done in male Wistar rats (total n = 127). Anesthesia was induced by isoflurane (2.5-3%) and maintained by fentanyl and midazolam during CPB. After catheterization of the left femoral artery, carotid artery and the right atrium, normothermic extracorporeal circulation was instituted for 60 minutes. In the first part of the study animals were euthanized after either 1 hour, 1 day, 2 or 5 days of the recovery period. In second part of the study animals were euthanized after 1 day of postoperative period. We evaluated the contractile response to phenylephrine (mesenteric arteries) or to serotonin (coronary artery) and vasodilatory response to acethylcholine (both arteries).
RESULTS: Contractile responses to phenylephrine were reduced at 1 day recovery after CPB and Sham as compared to healthy control animals (Emax, mN: 7.9±1.9, 6.5±1.5, and 11.3±1.3, respectively). Mainly FTY720, but not SEW2871, caused lymphopenia in both Sham and CPB groups. In coronary and mesenteric arteries, both FTY720 and SEW2871 normalized serotonin and phenylephrine-mediated vascular reactivity after CPB (p<0.05) and FTY720 increased relaxation to acetylcholine as compared with untreated rats that underwent CPB.
CONCLUSION: Pretreatment with FTY720 or SEW2871 preserves vascular function in mesenteric and coronary artery after CPB. Therefore, pharmacological activation of S1P1 receptors may provide a promising therapeutic intervention to prevent CPB-related vascular dysfunction in patients.

PMID: 24819611 [PubMed – in process]

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Serum ghrelin; a new surrogate marker of gastric mucosal alterations in upper gastrointestinal carcinogenesis.

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Serum ghrelin; a new surrogate marker of gastric mucosal alterations in upper gastrointestinal carcinogenesis.
PLoS One. 2013;8(9):e74440
Authors: Sadjadi A, Yazdanbod A, Lee YY, Boreiri M, Samadi F… Continue reading

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A Case-Control Study of the Protective Effect of Alcohol, Coffee, and Cigarette Consumption on Parkinson Disease Risk: Time-Since-Cessation Modifies the Effect of Tobacco Smoking.

A Case-Control Study of the Protective Effect of Alcohol, Coffee, and Cigarette Consumption on Parkinson Disease Risk: Time-Since-Cessation Modifies the Effect of Tobacco Smoking.

PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e95297

Authors: van der Mark M, Nijssen PC, Vlaanderen J, Huss A, Mulleners WM, Sas AM, van Laar T, Kromhout H, Vermeulen R

Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the possible reduced risk of Parkinson Disease (PD) due to coffee, alcohol, and/or cigarette consumption. In addition, we explored the potential effect modification by intensity, duration and time-since-cessation of smoking on the association between cumulative pack-years of cigarette smoking (total smoking) and PD risk. Data of a hospital based case-control study was used including 444 PD patients, diagnosed between 2006 and 2011, and 876 matched controls from 5 hospitals in the Netherlands. A novel modeling method was applied to derive unbiased estimates of the potential modifying effects of smoking intensity, duration, and time-since-cessation by conditioning on total exposure. We observed no reduced risk of PD by alcohol consumption and only a weak inverse association between coffee consumption and PD risk. However, a strong inverse association of total smoking with PD risk was observed (OR = 0.27 (95%CI: 0.18-0.42) for never smokers versus highest quartile of tobacco use). The observed protective effect of total smoking was significantly modified by time-since-cessation with a diminishing protective effect after cessation of smoking. No effect modification by intensity or duration of smoking was observed indicating that both intensity and duration have an equal contribution to the reduced PD risk. Understanding the dynamics of the protective effect of smoking on PD risk aids in understanding PD etiology and may contribute to strategies for prevention and treatment.

PMID: 24788751 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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AcmD, a homolog of the major autolysin AcmA of Lactococcus lactis, binds to the cell wall and contributes to cell separation and autolysis.

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AcmD, a homolog of the major autolysin AcmA of Lactococcus lactis, binds to the cell wall and contributes to cell separation and autolysis.
PLoS One. 2013;8(8):e72167
Authors: Visweswaran GR, Steen … Continue reading

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Combined Effects of Smoking and Alcohol on Metabolic Syndrome: The LifeLines Cohort Study.

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Combined Effects of Smoking and Alcohol on Metabolic Syndrome: The LifeLines Cohort Study.

PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e96406

Authors: Slagter SN, van Vliet-Ostaptchouk JV, Vonk JM, Boezen HM, Dullaart RP, Kobold AC, Feskens EJ, van Beek AP, van der Klauw MM, Wolffenbuttel BH

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is influenced by environmental factors such as smoking and alcohol consumption. We determined the combined effects of smoking and alcohol on MetS and its individual components.
METHODS: 64,046 participants aged 18-80 years from the LifeLines Cohort study were categorized into three body mass index (BMI) classes (BMI<25, normal weight; BMI 25-30, overweight; BMI≥30 kg/m2, obese). MetS was defined according to the revised criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III). Within each BMI class and smoking subgroup (non-smoker, former smoker, <20 and ≥20 g tobacco/day), the cross-sectional association between alcohol and individual MetS components was tested using regression analysis.
RESULTS: Prevalence of MetS varied greatly between the different smoking-alcohol subgroups (1.7-71.1%). HDL cholesterol levels in all alcohol drinkers were higher than in non-drinkers (0.02 to 0.29 mmol/L, P values<0.001). HDL cholesterol levels were lower when they were also a former or current smoker (<20 and ≥20 g tobacco/day). Consumption of ≤1 drink/day indicated a trend towards lower triglyceride levels (non-significant). Concurrent use alcohol (>1 drink/day) and tobacco showed higher triglycerides levels. Up to 2 drinks/day was associated with a smaller waist circumference in overweight and obese individuals. Consumption of >2 drinks/day increased blood pressure, with the strongest associations found for heavy smokers. The overall metabolic profile of wine drinkers was better than that of non-drinkers or drinkers of beer or spirits/mixed drinks.
CONCLUSION: Light alcohol consumption may moderate the negative associations of smoking with MetS. Our results suggest that the lifestyle advice that emphasizes smoking cessation and the restriction of alcohol consumption to a maximum of 1 drink/day, is a good approach to reduce the prevalence of MetS.

PMID: 24781037 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Chemokine-Like Receptor 1 Deficiency Does Not Affect the Development of Insulin Resistance and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice.

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Chemokine-Like Receptor 1 Deficiency Does Not Affect the Development of Insulin Resistance and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice.
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e96345
Authors: Gruben N, Aparicio Vergara … Continue reading

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Adolescents’ use of care for behavioral and emotional problems: types, trends, and determinants.

Adolescents’ use of care for behavioral and emotional problems: types, trends, and determinants.
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e93526
Authors: Reijneveld SA, Wiegersma PA, Ormel J, Verhulst FC, Vollebergh WA, Jansen DE
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A Meta-Analysis of Self-Reported Achievement Goals and Nonself-Report Performance across Three Achievement Domains (Work, Sports, and Education).

A Meta-Analysis of Self-Reported Achievement Goals and Nonself-Report Performance across Three Achievement Domains (Work, Sports, and Education).
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e93594
Authors: Van Yperen NW, Blaga M, Postmes T
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Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in the Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling.

Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in the Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling.
PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e89415
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Dealing with Consumer Differences in Liking during Repeated Exposure to Food; Typical Dynamics in Rating Behavior.

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Dealing with Consumer Differences in Liking during Repeated Exposure to Food; Typical Dynamics in Rating Behavior.
PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e93350
Authors: Dalenberg JR, Nanetti L, Renken RJ, de Wijk RA, Ter Horst G… Continue reading

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Keeping your eyes continuously on the ball while running for catchable and uncatchable fly balls.

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Keeping your eyes continuously on the ball while running for catchable and uncatchable fly balls.
PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e92392
Authors: Postma DB, den Otter AR, Zaal FT
Abstract
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Drug content effects on the dispersion performance of adhesive mixtures for inhalation.

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Drug content effects on the dispersion performance of adhesive mixtures for inhalation.
PLoS One. 2013;8(8):e71339
Authors: Grasmeijer F, Hagedoorn P, Frijlink HW, de Boer AH
Abstract
The drug… Continue reading

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Invasion success in a marginal habitat: an experimental test of competitive ability and drought tolerance in Chromolaena odorata.

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Invasion success in a marginal habitat: an experimental test of competitive ability and drought tolerance in Chromolaena odorata.
PLoS One. 2013;8(8):e68274
Authors: te Beest M, Elschot K, Olff H, Etienne RS
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The Predictive Value of the NICE “Red Traffic Lights” in Acutely Ill Children.

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The Predictive Value of the NICE “Red Traffic Lights” in Acutely Ill Children.

PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e90847

Authors: Kerkhof E, Lakhanpaul M, Ray S, Verbakel JY, Van den Bruel A, Thompson M, Berger MY, Moll HA, Oostenbrink R, European Research Network on recognising serious InfEctions (ERNIE) members

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Early recognition and treatment of febrile children with serious infections (SI) improves prognosis, however, early detection can be difficult. We aimed to validate the predictive rule-in value of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) most severe alarming signs or symptoms to identify SI in children.
DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The 16 most severe (“red”) features of the NICE traffic light system were validated in seven different primary care and emergency department settings, including 6,260 children presenting with acute illness.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We focussed on the individual predictive value of single red features for SI and their combinations. Results were presented as positive likelihood ratios, sensitivities and specificities. We categorised “general” and “disease-specific” red features. Changes in pre-test probability versus post-test probability for SI were visualised in Fagan nomograms.
RESULTS: Almost all red features had rule-in value for SI, but only four individual red features substantially raised the probability of SI in more than one dataset: “does not wake/stay awake”, “reduced skin turgor”, “non-blanching rash”, and “focal neurological signs”. The presence of ≥3 red features improved prediction of SI but still lacked strong rule-in value as likelihood ratios were below 5.
CONCLUSIONS: The rule-in value of the most severe alarming signs or symptoms of the NICE traffic light system for identifying children with SI was limited, even when multiple red features were present. Our study highlights the importance of assessing the predictive value of alarming signs in clinical guidelines prior to widespread implementation in routine practice.

PMID: 24633015 [PubMed – in process]

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Cooperation in networks where the learning environment differs from the interaction environment.

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Cooperation in networks where the learning environment differs from the interaction environment.
PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e90288
Authors: Zhang J, Zhang C, Chu T, Weissing FJ
Abstract
We study the ev… Continue reading

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Empathy versus Parsimony in Understanding Post-Conflict Affiliation in Monkeys: Model and Empirical Data.

Empathy versus Parsimony in Understanding Post-Conflict Affiliation in Monkeys: Model and Empirical Data.
PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e91262
Authors: Puga-Gonzalez I, Butovskaya M, Thierry B, Hemelrijk CK
Abstract
Post… Continue reading

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Identification of novel genes associated with renal tertiary lymphoid organ formation in aging mice.

Identification of novel genes associated with renal tertiary lymphoid organ formation in aging mice.

PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e91850

Authors: Huang Y, Caputo CR, Noordmans GA, Yazdani S, Monteiro LH, van den Born J, van Goor H, Heeringa P, Korstanje R, Hillebrands JL

Abstract
A hallmark of aging-related organ deterioration is a dysregulated immune response characterized by pathologic leukocyte infiltration of affected tissues. Mechanisms and genes involved are as yet unknown. To identify genes associated with aging-related renal infiltration, we analyzed kidneys from aged mice (≥20 strains) for infiltrating leukocytes followed by Haplotype Association Mapping (HAM) analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed CD45+ cell clusters (predominantly T and B cells) in perivascular areas coinciding with PNAd+ high endothelial venules and podoplanin+ lymph vessels indicative of tertiary lymphoid organs. Cumulative cluster size increased with age (analyzed at 6, 12 and 20 months). Based on the presence or absence of clusters in male and female mice at 20 months, HAM analysis revealed significant associations with loci on Chr1, Chr2, Chr8 and Chr14 in male mice, and with loci on Chr4, Chr7, Chr13 and Chr14 in female mice. Wisp2 (Chr2) showed the strongest association (P = 5.00×10-137) in male mice; Ctnnbip1 (P = 6.42×10-267) and Tnfrsf8 (P = 5.42×10-245) (both on Chr4) showed the strongest association in female mice. Both Wisp2 and Ctnnbip1 are part of the Wnt-signaling pathway and the encoded proteins were expressed within the tertiary lymphoid organs. In conclusion, this study revealed differential lymphocytic infiltration and tertiary lymphoid organ formation in aged mouse kidneys across different inbred mouse strains. HAM analysis identified candidate genes involved in the Wnt-signaling pathway that may be causally linked to tertiary lymphoid organ formation.

PMID: 24637805 [PubMed – in process]

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Interactions between blood-borne Streptococcus pneumoniae and the blood-brain barrier preceding meningitis.

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Interactions between blood-borne Streptococcus pneumoniae and the blood-brain barrier preceding meningitis.
PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e68408
Authors: Iovino F, Orihuela CJ, Moorlag HE, Molema G, Bijlsma JJ
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