Force analysis of bacterial transmission from contact lens cases to corneas, with the contact lens as the intermediary.

Force analysis of bacterial transmission from contact lens cases to corneas, with the contact lens as the intermediary.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011 Apr;52(5):2565-70

Authors: Qu W, Hooymans JM, de Vries J, van der Mei HC, Busscher HJ

Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the probability of transmission of a Staphylococcus aureus strain from a contact lens case, to the contact lens (CL) surfaces, to the cornea, on the basis of bacterial adhesion forces measured by using atomic force microscopy (AFM).
METHODS: Adhesion forces between S. aureus strain 835 probes with rigid and soft CLs, storage cases, and porcine corneas were measured with AFM and used to calculate Weibull distributions, from which the transmission probability from one surface to another was derived. Bacterial transmission probabilities from force analyses were compared with experimentally obtained transmission data.
RESULTS: After bond-strengthening, S. aureus adhered to the surface of a lens case with a median force of 10.8 nN. Adhesion forces were different on the soft and rigid CLs (7.7 and 13.6 nN, respectively). Adhesion forces on porcine corneas amounted to 11.8 nN. Data variations were used to calculate the Weibull distribution, from which the probability of transmission from the lens case to a CL and from the CL to the cornea can be directly read. Final transmission probabilities from lens case to the cornea were slightly higher for the rigid (24%) than for the soft (19%) CL. Bacterial transmission determined experimentally increased with increasing contact times, but were within the range of the probabilities derived from Weibull analyses.
CONCLUSIONS: Probabilities of bacterial transmission from contaminated lens cases to corneas can be derived from Weibull analyses of measured forces of adhesion to the surfaces involved.

PMID: 21245392 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

This entry was posted in Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.