Category Archives: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract

The effects of a non-cognitive versus cognitive admission procedure within cohorts in one medical school.






The effects of a non-cognitive versus cognitive admission procedure within cohorts in one medical school.

Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2017 Jun 10;:

Authors: de Visser M, Fluit C, Cohen-Schotanus J, Laan R

Abstract
In medical school selection, non-cognitive performance in particular correlates with performance in clinical practice. It is arguable, therefore, that selection should focus on non-cognitive aspects despite the predictive value of prior cognitive performance for early medical school performance. The aim of this study at Radboud University Medical Center, the Netherlands, is to determine the effects of admitting students through an autonomous non-cognitive procedure on early medical school performance. We compared their performance to the performance of students selected through an autonomous cognitive selection procedure, enrolling in the Bachelor’s curriculum simultaneously. 574 students (2013 and 2014 cohorts), admitted through non-cognitive selection (based on portfolio, CASPer and MMI, n = 135) or cognitive selection (curriculum sample selection, n = 439) were included in the study. We compared dropout rates, course credits and grades, using logistic and linear regression. The dropout rate was the highest in the non-cognitive selection group (p < 0.001). Students admitted through non-cognitive selection more often obtained the highest grade for the nursing attachment (p = 0.02) and had a higher mean grade for the practical clinical course in year 3 (p = .04). No differences in course grades were found. The results indicate that students perform best on the elements of the curriculum that are represented most strongly in the selection procedure they had participated in. We recommend the use of curriculum sample procedures, resembling the early medical school curriculum,-whether it has a more cognitive or a more non-cognitive focus-, to select the students who are likely to be successful in the subsequent curriculum.

PMID: 28601913 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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What supervisors say in their feedback: construction of CanMEDS roles in workplace settings.






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What supervisors say in their feedback: construction of CanMEDS roles in workplace settings.
Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2015 Sep 5;
Authors: Renting N, Dornan T, Gans RO, Borleffs JC, Cohen-Sch… Continue reading






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Influence of PBL with open-book tests on knowledge retention measured with progress tests.






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Influence of PBL with open-book tests on knowledge retention measured with progress tests.

Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2013 Aug;18(3):485-95

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Student distress in clinical workplace learning: differences in social comparison behaviours.






Student distress in clinical workplace learning: differences in social comparison behaviours.

Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2014 May 17;

Authors: Janet Raat AN, Schönrock-Adema J, van Hell EA, Kuks JB, Cohen-Schotanus J

Abstract
In medical education, student distress is known to hamper learning and professional development. To address this problem, recent studies aimed at helping students cope with stressful situations. Undergraduate students in clinical practice frequently use experiences of surrounding peers to estimate their abilities to master such challenging situations. This use of the experiences of others, known as social comparison, may affect student distress both positively and negatively. To find characteristics of a beneficial use of social comparison, we examined differences in comparison behaviours between students expressing low and high levels of distress. The participants in our study, response rate 93 % (N = 301/321), were all medical students in their first year in clinical practice. They completed the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) to measure distress, and three separate questionnaires to measure: (1) orientation to comparison, (2) motive for comparison, and (3) interpretation of comparison. Differences were analysed using multivariate analysis of variance. Although all students were oriented towards social comparison, the analyses showed that this orientation was less apparent among low-distress students. Besides, the low-distress students were less inclined to use motives indicative for comparisons with peers perceived as performing worse and were less negative in the interpretations of their comparisons. As social comparison is frequently used among all students, we recommend to make them aware of their comparison behaviours and inform them about the pros and cons of the distinguished aspects of the comparison process.

PMID: 24838597 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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The influence of achievement before, during and after medical school on physician job satisfaction.






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The influence of achievement before, during and after medical school on physician job satisfaction.

Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2014 Jan 24;

Authors:…

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Key elements in assessing the educational environment: where is the theory?






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Key elements in assessing the educational environment: where is the theory?

Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2012 Dec;17(5):727-42

Authors: Schönrock-Adema J, Bouwkamp-Timmer T, van Hell EA, Cohen-Schotanus J

Abstract
The educational environment has been increasingly acknowledged as vital for high-quality medical education. As a result, several instruments have been developed to measure medical educational environment quality. However, there appears to be no consensus about which concepts should be measured. The absence of a theoretical framework may explain this lack of consensus. Therefore, we aimed to (1) find a comprehensive theoretical framework defining the essential concepts, and (2) test its applicability. An initial review of the medical educational environment literature indicated that such frameworks are lacking. Therefore, we chose an alternative approach to lead us to relevant frameworks from outside the medical educational field; that is, we applied a snowballing technique to find educational environment instruments used to build the contents of the medical ones and investigated their theoretical underpinnings (Study 1). We found two frameworks, one of which was described as incomplete and one of which defines three domains as the key elements of human environments (personal development/goal direction, relationships, and system maintenance and system change) and has been validated in different contexts. To test its applicability, we investigated whether the items of nine medical educational environment instruments could be mapped unto the framework (Study 2). Of 374 items, 94% could: 256 (68%) pertained to a single domain, 94 (25%) to more than one domain. In our context, these domains were found to concern goal orientation, relationships and organization/regulation. We conclude that this framework is applicable and comprehensive, and recommend using it as theoretical underpinning for medical educational environment measures.

PMID: 22307806 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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