Category Archives: Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging

EANM/EARL harmonization strategies in PET quantification: from daily practice to multicentre oncological studies.






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EANM/EARL harmonization strategies in PET quantification: from daily practice to multicentre oncological studies.
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2017 Jun 16;:
Authors: Aide N, Lasnon C, Veit-Haibach P, S… Continue reading

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Performance of cardiac cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera imaging in coronary artery disease: a review from the cardiovascular committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM).






Performance of cardiac cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera imaging in coronary artery disease: a review from the cardiovascular committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM).

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2016 Aug 19;

Authors: Agostini D, Marie PY, Ben-Haim S, Rouzet F, Songy B, Giordano A, Gimelli A, Hyafil F, Sciagrà R, Bucerius J, Verberne HJ, Slart RH, Lindner O, Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

Abstract
The trade-off between resolution and count sensitivity dominates the performance of standard gamma cameras and dictates the need for relatively high doses of radioactivity of the used radiopharmaceuticals in order to limit image acquisition duration. The introduction of cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)-based cameras may overcome some of the limitations against conventional gamma cameras. CZT cameras used for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion have been shown to have a higher count sensitivity compared to conventional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques. CZT image quality is further improved by the development of a dedicated three-dimensional iterative reconstruction algorithm, based on maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), which corrects for the loss in spatial resolution due to line response function of the collimator. All these innovations significantly reduce imaging time and result in a lower patient’s radiation exposure compared with standard SPECT. To guide current and possible future users of the CZT technique for myocardial perfusion imaging, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, has decided to examine the current literature regarding procedures and clinical data on CZT cameras. The committee hereby aims 1) to identify the main acquisitions protocols; 2) to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of CZT derived myocardial perfusion, and finally 3) to determine the impact of CZT on radiation exposure.

PMID: 27542010 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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One registration multi-atlas-based pseudo-CT generation for attenuation correction in PET/MRI.






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One registration multi-atlas-based pseudo-CT generation for attenuation correction in PET/MRI.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2016 Jun 3;

Authors: Arabi H, Zaidi H

Abstract
PURPOSE: The outcome of a detailed assessment of various strategies for atlas-based whole-body bone segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was exploited to select the optimal parameters and setting, with the aim of proposing a novel one-registration multi-atlas (ORMA) pseudo-CT generation approach.
METHODS: The proposed approach consists of only one online registration between the target and reference images, regardless of the number of atlas images (N), while for the remaining atlas images, the pre-computed transformation matrices to the reference image are used to align them to the target image. The performance characteristics of the proposed method were evaluated and compared with conventional atlas-based attenuation map generation strategies (direct registration of the entire atlas images followed by voxel-wise weighting (VWW) and arithmetic averaging atlas fusion). To this end, four different positron emission tomography (PET) attenuation maps were generated via arithmetic averaging and VWW scheme using both direct registration and ORMA approaches as well as the 3-class attenuation map obtained from the Philips Ingenuity TF PET/MRI scanner commonly used in the clinical setting. The evaluation was performed based on the accuracy of extracted whole-body bones by the different attenuation maps and by quantitative analysis of resulting PET images compared to CT-based attenuation-corrected PET images serving as reference.
RESULTS: The comparison of validation metrics regarding the accuracy of extracted bone using the different techniques demonstrated the superiority of the VWW atlas fusion algorithm achieving a Dice similarity measure of 0.82 ± 0.04 compared to arithmetic averaging atlas fusion (0.60 ± 0.02), which uses conventional direct registration. Application of the ORMA approach modestly compromised the accuracy, yielding a Dice similarity measure of 0.76 ± 0.05 for ORMA-VWW and 0.55 ± 0.03 for ORMA-averaging. The results of quantitative PET analysis followed the same trend with less significant differences in terms of SUV bias, whereas massive improvements were observed compared to PET images corrected for attenuation using the 3-class attenuation map. The maximum absolute bias achieved by VWW and VWW-ORMA methods was 06.4 ± 5.5 in the lung and 07.9 ± 4.8 in the bone, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: The proposed algorithm is capable of generating decent attenuation maps. The quantitative analysis revealed a good correlation between PET images corrected for attenuation using the proposed pseudo-CT generation approach and the corresponding CT images. The computational time is reduced by a factor of 1/N at the expense of a modest decrease in quantitative accuracy, thus allowing us to achieve a reasonable compromise between computing time and quantitative performance.

PMID: 27260522 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Positron emission tomography of tumour [(18)F]fluoroestradiol uptake in patients with acquired hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer prior to oestradiol therapy.






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Positron emission tomography of tumour [(18)F]fluoroestradiol uptake in patients with acquired hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer prior to oestradiol therapy.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2015 Jun 20;

Authors: van Kruchten M, Glaudemans AW, de Vries EF, Schröder CP, de Vries EG, Hospers GA

Abstract
PURPOSE: Whereas anti-oestrogen therapy is widely applied to treat oestrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, paradoxically, oestrogens can also induce tumour regression. Up-regulation of ER expression is a marker for oestrogen hypersensitivity. We, therefore, performed an exploratory study to evaluate positron emission tomography (PET) with the tracer 16α-[(18)F]fluoro-17β-oestradiol ((18)F-FES) as potential marker to select breast cancer patients for oestradiol therapy.
METHODS: Eligible patients had acquired endocrine-resistant metastatic breast cancer that progressed after ≥2 lines of endocrine therapy. All patients had prior ER-positive histology. Treatment consisted of oestradiol 2 mg, three times daily, orally. Patients underwent (18)F-FES-PET/CT imaging at baseline. Tumour (18)F-FES-uptake was quantified for a maximum of 20 lesions and expressed as maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax). CT-scan was repeated every 3 months to evaluate treatment response. Clinical benefit was defined as time to radiologic or clinical progression ≥24 weeks.
RESULTS: (18)F-FES uptake, quantified for 255 lesions in 19 patients, varied greatly between lesions (median 2.8; range 0.6-24.3) and between patients (median 2.5; range 1.1-15.5). Seven (37 %) patients experienced clinical benefit of oestrogen therapy, eight progressed (PD), and four were non-evaluable due to side effects. The positive and negative predictive value (PPV/NPV) of (18)F-FES-PET for response to treatment were 60 % (95 % CI: 31-83 %) and 80 % (95 % CI: 38-96 %), respectively, using SUVmax >1.5.
CONCLUSION: (18)F-FES-PET may aid identification of patients with acquired antihormone resistant breast cancer that are unlikely to benefit from oestradiol therapy.

PMID: 26091705 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Evaluation of [(11)C]CB184 for imaging and quantification of TSPO overexpression in a rat model of herpes encephalitis.






Evaluation of [(11)C]CB184 for imaging and quantification of TSPO overexpression in a rat model of herpes encephalitis.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2015 Mar 13;

Authors: Vállez Garcia D, de Vries EF, Toyohara J, Ishiwata K, Hatano K, Dierckx RA, Doorduin J

Abstract
PURPOSE: Evaluation of translocator protein (TSPO) overexpression is considered an attractive research tool for monitoring neuroinflammation in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. [(11)C]PK11195 PET imaging has been widely used for this purpose. However, it has a low sensitivity and a poor signal-to-noise ratio. For these reasons, [(11)C]CB184 was evaluated as a potentially more sensitive PET tracer.
METHODS: A model of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) was induced in male Wistar rats. On day 6 or 7 after virus inoculation, [(11)C]CB184 PET scans were acquired followed by ex vivo evaluation of biodistribution. In addition, [(11)C]CB184 and [(11)C]PK11195 PET scans with arterial blood sampling were acquired to generate input for pharmacokinetic modelling. Differences between the saline-treated control group and the virus-treated HSE group were explored using volumes of interest and voxel-based analysis.
RESULTS: The biodistribution study showed significantly higher [(11)C]CB184 uptake in the amygdala, olfactory bulb, medulla, pons and striatum (p < 0.05) in HSE rats than in control rats, and the voxel-based analysis showed higher bilateral uptake in the pons and medulla (p < 0.05, corrected at the cluster level). A high correlation was found between tracer uptake in the biodistribution study and on the PET scans (p < 0.001, r (2) = 0.71). Pretreatment with 5 mg/kg of unlabelled PK11195 effectively reduced (p < 0.001) [(11)C]CB184 uptake in the whole brain. Both, [(11)C]CB184 and [(11)C]PK11195, showed similar amounts of metabolites in plasma, and the binding potential (BPND) was not significantly different between the HSE rats and the control rats. In HSE rats BPND for [(11)C]CB184 was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the amygdala, hypothalamus, medulla, pons and septum than in control rats, whereas higher uptake of [(11)C]PK11195 was only detected in the medulla.
CONCLUSION: [(11)C]CB184 showed nonspecific binding to healthy tissue comparable to that observed for [(11)C]PK11195, but it displayed significantly higher specific binding in those brain regions affected by the HSE. Our results suggest that [(11)C]CB184 PET is a good alternative for imaging of neuroinflammatory processes.

PMID: 25771904 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Breast cancer: a new imaging approach as an addition to existing guidelines.






Breast cancer: a new imaging approach as an addition to existing guidelines.
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2015 Mar 12;
Authors: Dorrius MD, de Vries EF, Slart RH, Glaudemans AW
PMID: 25761830 [PubMed – as supp… Continue reading






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Multiple skeletal lesions on FDG PET in severe primary hyperparathyroidism.






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Multiple skeletal lesions on FDG PET in severe primary hyperparathyroidism.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2014 Jan;41(1):182-3

Authors: Kerstens…

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A large retrospective single-centre study to define the best image acquisition protocols and interpretation criteria for white blood cell scintigraphy with ⁹⁹mTc-HMPAO-labelled leucocytes in musculoskeletal infections.






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A large retrospective single-centre study to define the best image acquisition protocols and interpretation criteria for white blood cell scintigraphy with ⁹⁹mTc-HMPAO-labelled leucocytes in musculoskeletal infections.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2013 Oct;40(11):1760-9

Authors: Glaudemans AW, de Vries EF, Vermeulen LE, Slart RH, Dierckx RA, Signore A

Abstract
PURPOSE: The diagnosis of infection is often based on clinical, pathological and microbiological results. However, these investigations lack specificity. White blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy is considered the gold standard nuclear imaging technique for diagnosing infections in bone and soft tissues (except spondylodiscitis). However, image acquisition and interpretation criteria differ amongst centres throughout the world, leading to differences in reported results. The aim of this study was to identify the most accurate WBC scintigraphy acquisition and interpretation protocols for diagnosis of bone and soft tissue infections.
METHODS: Included in this retrospective study were 297 patients with suspected bone or soft tissue infection who underwent WBC scintigraphy with (99m)Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocytes between 2009 and 2012. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values of WBC scintigraphy were determined for two different dual time point acquisition protocols (fixed-time acquisition and time decay-corrected acquisition) and five image interpretation methods (visual and semiquantitative with four different reference regions of interest). Final diagnosis was based on pathological and microbiological reports, and when these were not available, on clinical follow-up of at least 6 months.
RESULTS: The best acquisition protocol was 4 h and 20 – 24 h dual time-point acquisition with time decay-corrected acquisition. When using this acquisition protocol, visual qualitative interpretation led to a sensitivity of 85.1 %, a specificity of 97.1 %, a diagnostic accuracy of 94.5 %, a positive predictive value of 88.8 % and a negative predictive value of 95.9 %. For semiquantitative analysis, the best results were found when lesion-to-reference ratios were calculated with the contralateral side as the reference tissue, except for osteomyelitis and infected osteosynthesis, for which the contralateral bone marrow was found to be the best reference tissue. Results of the semiquantitative analyses per se were not better than for visual analysis. In the optimal analysis protocol, scans are first visually evaluated, and if this gives equivocal results, semiquantitative analysis is performed. This strategy resulted in an improved sensitivity of 97.9 %, a specificity of 91.8 % and a diagnostic accuracy of 93.1 %.
CONCLUSION: WBC scintigraphy for bone and soft-tissue infection is best performed using a dual acquisition protocol at 4 h and at 20-24 h after injection, in which the acquisition time of the scans is corrected for decay. In most patients, visual analysis is sufficient and leads to high diagnostic accuracy. When interpretation by visual analysis is inconclusive, semiquantitative analysis adds accuracy. Based on our results, we propose a flow chart for analysing WBC scintigraphy in musculoskeletal infections.

PMID: 23860739 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Rapid optical imaging of human breast tumour xenografts using anti-HER2 VHHs site-directly conjugated to IRDye 800CW for image-guided surgery.






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Rapid optical imaging of human breast tumour xenografts using anti-HER2 VHHs site-directly conjugated to IRDye 800CW for image-guided surgery.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2013 Oct;40(11):1718-29

Authors: Kijanka M, Warnders FJ, El Khattabi M, Lub-de Hooge M, van Dam GM, Ntziachristos V, de Vries L, Oliveira S, van Bergen En Henegouwen PM

Abstract
PURPOSE: Molecular optical imaging using monoclonal antibodies is slow with low tumour to background ratio. We used anti-HER2 VHHs conjugated to IRDye 800CW to investigate their potential as probes for rapid optical molecular imaging of HER2-positive tumours by the determination of tumour accumulation and tumour to background levels.
METHODS: Three anti-HER2 VHHs (11A4, 18C3, 22G12) were selected with phage display and produced in Escherichia coli. Binding affinities of these probes to SKBR3 cells were determined before and after site-specific conjugation to IRDye 800CW. To determine the potential of VHH-IR as imaging probes, serial optical imaging studies were carried out using human SKBR3 and human MDA-MB-231 xenograft breast cancer models. Performance of the anti-HER2 VHH-IR was compared to that of trastuzumab-IR and a non-HER2-specific VHH-IR. Image-guided surgery was performed during which SKBR3 tumour was removed under the guidance of the VHH-IR signal.
RESULTS: Site-specific conjugation of IRDye 800CW to three anti-HER2 VHHs preserved high affinity binding with the following dissociation constants (KD): 11A4 1.9 ± 0.03, 18C3 14.3 ± 1.8 and 22G12 3.2 ± 0.5 nM. Based upon different criteria such as binding, production yield and tumour accumulation, 11A4 was selected for further studies. Comparison of 11A4-IR with trastuzumab-IR showed ∼20 times faster tumour accumulation of the anti-HER2 VHH, with a much higher contrast between tumour and background tissue (11A4-IR 2.5 ± 0.3, trastuzumab-IR 1.4 ± 0.4, 4 h post-injection). 11A4-IR was demonstrated to be a useful tool in image-guided surgery.
CONCLUSION: VHH-IR led to a much faster tumour accumulation with high tumour to background ratios as compared to trastuzumab-IR allowing same-day imaging for clinical investigation as well as image-guided surgery.

PMID: 23778558 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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In vivo and in vitro evidence that (99m)Tc-HYNIC-interleukin-2 is able to detect T lymphocytes in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques of the carotid artery.






In vivo and in vitro evidence that (99m)Tc-HYNIC-interleukin-2 is able to detect T lymphocytes in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques of the carotid artery.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2014 Apr 16;

Authors: Glaudemans AW, Bonanno E, Galli F, Zeebregts CJ, de Vries EF, Koole M, Luurtsema G, Boersma HH, Taurino M, Slart RH, Signore A

Abstract
PURPOSE: Recent advances in basic science have established that inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Inflammatory cells are thought to be responsible for the transformation of a stable plaque into a vulnerable one. Lymphocytes constitute at least 20 % of infiltrating cells in these vulnerable plaques. Therefore, the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor, being overexpressed on activated T lymphocytes, may represent an attractive biomarker for plaque vulnerability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the specificity of radiolabelled IL-2 [(99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC)-IL-2] for imaging the lymphocytic infiltration in carotid plaques in vivo by planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging and ex vivo by microSPECT and autoradiography.
METHODS: For the in vivo study, ten symptomatic patients with advanced plaques at ultrasound who were scheduled for carotid endarterectomy underwent (99m)Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 scintigraphy. The images were analysed visually on planar and SPECT images and semi-quantitatively on SPECT images by calculating target to background (T/B) ratios. After endarterectomy, immunomorphological evaluation and immunophenotyping were performed on plaque slices. For the ex vivo studies, four additional patients were included and, after in vitro incubation of removed plaques with (99m)Tc-HYNIC-IL-2, autoradiography was performed and microSPECT images were acquired.
RESULTS: Visual analysis defined clear (99m)Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 uptake in seven of the ten symptomatic plaques. SPECT/CT allowed visualization in eight of ten. A significant correlation was found between the number of CD25+ lymphocytes and the total number of CD25+ cells in the plaque and the T/B ratio with adjacent carotid artery as background (Pearson’s r = 0.89, p = 0.003 and r = 0.87, p = 0.005, respectively). MicroSPECT imaging showed clear (99m)Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 uptake within the plaque wall and not in the lipidic core. With autoradiography, only CD3+ lymphocytes were found to be labelled.
CONCLUSION: These in vivo and ex vivo studies confirm the specificity of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 for imaging activated T lymphocytes in carotid plaques. (99m)Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 is a true marker for the inflamed plaque and therefore of plaque instability.

PMID: 24737117 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Cushingoid facies on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.






Cushingoid facies on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2014 Apr 16;
Authors: van Rheenen RW, Glaudemans AW, LA Plasschaert S, Noordzij W, Slart RH
PMID: 24737116 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Reply to comment by Koranda: (99m)Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocytes in musculoskeletal infections-the choice of reference tissue for a semiquantitative analysis.






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Reply to comment by Koranda: (99m)Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocytes in musculoskeletal infections-the choice of reference tissue for a semiquantitative analysis.

Eur J…

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PET imaging of focal demyelination and remyelination in a rat model of multiple sclerosis: comparison of [(11)C]MeDAS, [ (11)C]CIC and [ (11)C]PIB.






PET imaging of focal demyelination and remyelination in a rat model of multiple sclerosis: comparison of [(11)C]MeDAS, [ (11)C]CIC and [ (11)C]PIB.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2014 Feb 6;

Authors: de Paula Faria D, Copray S, Sijbesma JW, Willemsen AT, Buchpiguel CA, Dierckx RA, de Vries EF

Abstract
PURPOSE: In this study, we compared the ability of [(11)C]CIC, [(11)C]MeDAS and [(11)C]PIB to reveal temporal changes in myelin content in focal lesions in the lysolecithin rat model of multiple sclerosis. Pharmacokinetic modelling was performed to determine the best method to quantify tracer uptake.
METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were stereotactically injected with either 1 % lysolecithin or saline into the corpus callosum and striatum of the right brain hemisphere. Dynamic PET imaging with simultaneous arterial blood sampling was performed 7 days after saline injection (control group), 7 days after lysolecithin injection (demyelination group) and 4 weeks after lysolecithin injection (remyelination group).
RESULTS: The kinetics of [(11)C]CIC, [(11)C]MeDAS and [(11)C]PIB was best fitted by Logan graphical analysis, suggesting that tracer binding is reversible. Compartment modelling revealed that all tracers were fitted best with the reversible two-tissue compartment model. Tracer uptake and distribution volume in lesions were in agreement with myelin status. However, the slow kinetics and homogeneous brain uptake of [(11)C]CIC make this tracer less suitable for in vivo PET imaging. [(11)C]PIB showed good uptake in the white matter in the cerebrum, but [(11)C]PIB uptake in the cerebellum was low, despite high myelin density in this region. [(11)C]MeDAS distribution correlated well with myelin density in different brain regions.
CONCLUSION: This study showed that PET imaging of demyelination and remyelination processes in focal lesions is feasible. Our comparison of three myelin tracers showed that [(11)C]MeDAS has more favourable properties for quantitative PET imaging of demyelinated and remyelinated lesions throughout the CNS than [(11)C]CIC and [(11)C]PIB.

PMID: 24499866 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Myocardial perfusion reserve in spared myocardium: correlation with infarct size and left ventricular ejection fraction.






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Myocardial perfusion reserve in spared myocardium: correlation with infarct size and left ventricular ejection fraction.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2013…

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Utility of 18F-FDG PET(/CT) in patients with systemic and localized amyloidosis.






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Utility of 18F-FDG PET(/CT) in patients with systemic and localized amyloidosis.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2013 Jul;40(7):1095-101

Authors: Glaudemans…

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Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on choline PET/CT in recurrent prostate cancer.






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Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on choline PET/CT in recurrent prostate cancer.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2013 Jul;40 Suppl 1:S41-7

Authors: …

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Nuclear imaging in proliferative angiopathy.






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Nuclear imaging in proliferative angiopathy.
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2013 Dec 3;
Authors: Kolderman SE, Noordzij W, van Dijk JM, Luijckx GJ
PMID: 24297505 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Value of 11C-methionine PET in imaging brain tumours and metastases.






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Value of 11C-methionine PET in imaging brain tumours and metastases.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2013 Apr;40(4):615-35

Authors: Glaudemans AW, Enting RH,…

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Pharmacokinetic modelling of N-(4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoyl)interleukin-2 binding to activated lymphocytes in an xenograft model of inflammation.






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Pharmacokinetic modelling of N-(4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoyl)interleukin-2 binding to activated lymphocytes in an xenograft model of inflammation.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2012 Oct;39(10):1551-60

Authors: Di Gialleonardo V, Signore A, Willemsen AT, Sijbesma JW, Dierckx RA, de Vries EF

Abstract
PURPOSE: N-(4-[(18)F]Fluorobenzoyl)interleukin-2 ([(18)F]FB-IL2) specifically binds to interleukin-2 receptors (IL-2R) and thus may be used to detect inflammation processes using positron emission tomography (PET). We now validated whether [(18)F]FB-IL2 can be used to quantify activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) in rats by pharmacokinetic modelling.
METHODS: Eleven Wistar rats were subcutaneously inoculated in the shoulder with different amounts of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) activated hPBMC 15 min before i.v. injection of [(18)F]FB-IL2. A 60-min dynamic PET scan was acquired and arterial blood sampling and metabolite analysis were performed. At the end of the scan, animals were terminated and the inflammatory lesion dissected. PET data were analysed using Logan and Patlak analysis as well as one-tissue and two-tissue compartment models. Model preferences according to the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and correlation between PET measurements and the number of CD25-positive cells were evaluated.
RESULTS: A high correlation between ex vivo tracer uptake (standardized uptake value) in the xenograft and the number of inoculated CD25-positive cells was observed (R (2) = 0.90). Plasma time-activity curves showed a rapid washout of the radiopharmaceutical from blood, while the time-activity curves of the inflammatory lesions showed slower washout. Time-activity curves could be fitted well by the Logan analysis method, indicating that the binding between [(18)F]FB-IL2 and CD25 is reversible. AIC indicated that data could be modelled best by a two-tissue reversible compartment model. A high correlation was observed between the binding potential and the number of CD25-positive cells (R (2) = 0.876, p < 0.0001). Based on binding potential measured by PET, the limit of detection was about 160,000 CD25-positive cells per 200 μl lesion (95 % confidence).
CONCLUSION: [(18)F]FB-IL2 kinetics in this animal model of inflammation could be best described by a reversible two-tissue compartment model. The [(18)F]FB-IL2 binding potential is a suitable measure for accurate quantification of lymphocytic infiltration in pathological conditions with PET.

PMID: 22777334 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Prognostic value of the standardized uptake value for (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose in patients with stage IIIB melanoma.






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Prognostic value of the standardized uptake value for (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose in patients with stage IIIB melanoma.
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2012 Oct;39(10):1592-8
Authors: Bastiaannet E, Hoekstra OS, de J… Continue reading






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