Category Archives: Clin Psychol Psychother

Associations of Depressive Rumination and Positive Affect Regulation with Emotional Distress After the Death of a Loved One.

Related Articles
Associations of Depressive Rumination and Positive Affect Regulation with Emotional Distress After the Death of a Loved One.
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2020 May 31;:
Authors: Boelen PA, Lenferink LIM
Continue reading

Posted in Clin Psychol Psychother | Tagged | Leave a comment

A Cross-Sectional Study of Psychological Comparison Processes That May Underlie the Acceptance of Chronic Pain.

A Cross-Sectional Study of Psychological Comparison Processes That May Underlie the Acceptance of Chronic Pain.

Clin Psychol Psychother. 2015 Aug 4;

Authors: Orfgen H, Dijkstra A

Abstract
Acceptance of chronic pain varies between patients but may also be expected to develop and change within patients. In this latter framework, the present study explored three psychological processes that may contribute to changes in acceptance: social comparisons, temporal comparisons and counterfactual comparisons. In general, these comparisons are used to cope with negative life events, and they may also play a role in acceptance of pain. In this study, the two subscales of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (Activity Engagement and Pain Willingness) were complemented with a scale of Affective Acceptance. Using linear regression analyses, data from these three acceptance scales were regressed on three scales of temporal comparison processes, four scales of social comparison processes and one scale of counterfactual comparisons. The results showed that the comparison processes explained up to 37% of the variance in acceptance, especially a higher frequency of thinking of one’s present condition in relation to a condition in the past, and feeling bad when comparing with others who are doing better, were consistently related to lower acceptance. These explorative results may inspire experimental studies to influence comparison processes and, eventually, to address those comparison processes in interventions for patients with chronic pain to improve acceptance. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
KEY PRACTITIONER MESSAGE: In addition to beliefs indicating Activity Engagement and Pain Willingness, Affective acceptance of pain may also be a relevant dimension and manifestation of acceptance Social comparisons, temporal comparisons and counterfactual comparisons are related to acceptance of pain In patients with pain psychological comparison processes can be relevant in diagnosing possible causes of non-optimal acceptance of chronic pain Practitioners may try to influence each of the three types of psychological comparison processes in individuals and observe the effects.

PMID: 26238435 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Clin Psychol Psychother | Leave a comment

Judgmental Biases of Individuals with a Fear of Blushing: The Role of Relatively Strict Social Norms.

Related Articles

Judgmental Biases of Individuals with a Fear of Blushing: The Role of Relatively Strict Social Norms.

Clin Psychol Psychother. 2015 May 20;

Authors: Dijk C, de Jong PJ, Peters ML

Abstract
Blushing-fearful individuals often expect that others will judge them negatively. In two studies, we tested if this could be explained by having relatively strict beliefs about what is appropriate social behaviour. Study 1 used a student sample (n = 74), whereas study 2 compared a clinical treatment-seeking sample of blushing-fearful individuals (n = 33) with a non-anxious control group (n = 31). In both studies, participants were asked to read descriptions of common behaviours that could be considered as breaching the prevailing social norms but not necessarily so. Participants indicated (i) to what extent they considered these behaviours as violating the prevailing norm and (ii) their expectation of observers’ judgments. Study 1 showed that strict norms were indeed related to fear of blushing and that the tendency of fearful participants to expect negative judgments could at least partly explain this relationship. Study 2 showed that high-fearful and low-fearful individuals do indeed differ in the strictness of their norms and that especially the norms that individuals apply to themselves might be relevant. These findings may provide fresh clues for improving available treatment options. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
KEY PRACTITIONER MESSAGES: Blushing-fearful individuals attribute relatively strict social norms to other people about which behaviours are appropriate and which are not and have stricter personal norms as well. Blushing-fearful individuals’ tendency to expect overly negative judgments in ambivalent social situations can partly be explained by their relatively strict social norms. Having relatively strict social norms may (also) explain why blushing-fearful individuals report to blush often and intensely. It may be worthwhile to address strict social norms in therapy for fear of blushing.

PMID: 25994922 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Continue reading

Posted in Clin Psychol Psychother | Leave a comment

Clinical features, prevalence and psychiatric complaints in subjects with fear of vomiting.

Related Articles

Clinical features, prevalence and psychiatric complaints in subjects with fear of vomiting.

Clin Psychol Psychother. 2012 Nov-Dec;19(6):531-9

Authors: van…

Continue reading

Posted in Clin Psychol Psychother | Tagged | Leave a comment

Dysfunctional beliefs in the process of change of cognitive treatment in obsessive compulsive checkers.

Dysfunctional beliefs in the process of change of cognitive treatment in obsessive compulsive checkers.

Clin Psychol Psychother. 2011 May-Jun;18(3):256-73

Authors: Polman A, Bouman…

Continue reading

Posted in Clin Psychol Psychother | Tagged | Comments Off on Dysfunctional beliefs in the process of change of cognitive treatment in obsessive compulsive checkers.