Category Archives: Ann Oncol

Molecular imaging as a tool to investigate heterogeneity of advanced HER2-positive breast cancer and to predict patient outcome under trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1): the ZEPHIR Trial.

Molecular imaging as a tool to investigate heterogeneity of advanced HER2-positive breast cancer and to predict patient outcome under trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1): the ZEPHIR Trial.

Ann Oncol. 2015 Nov 23;

Authors: Gebhart G, Lamberts LE, Wimana Z, Garcia C, Emonts P, Ameye L, Stroobants S, Huizing M, Aftimos P, Tol J, Oyen WJ, Vugts DJ, Hoekstra OS, Schröder CP, Menke-van der Houven van Oordt CW, Guiot T, Brouwers AH, Awada A, de Vries EG, Flamen P

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Only human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2-status determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been validated to predict efficacy of HER2-targeting antibody-drug-conjugate trastuzumab-emtansine (T-DM1). We propose molecular imaging to explore intra-/interpatient heterogeneity in HER2-mapping of metastatic disease and to identify patients unlikely to benefit from T-DM1.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: HER2-positive mBC patients with IHC3+ or FISH≥2.2 scheduled for T-DM1 underwent a pre-treatment HER2-PET/CT with (89)Zr-trastuzumab. FDG-PET/CT was performed at baseline and before T-DM1 cycle 2. Patients were grouped into four HER2-PET/CT patterns according to the proportion of FDG-avid tumor load showing relevant (89)Zr-trastuzumab uptake (> bloodpool activity): patterns A and B were considered positive (>50% or all of the tumor load “positive”); patterns C and D were considered negative (>50% or all of the tumor load “negative”). Early FDG-PET/CT was defined as non-responding when>50% of the tumor load showed no significant reduction of FDG-uptake (< 15%). Negative and positive predictive values (NPV, PPV) of HER2-PET/CT, early FDG-response and their combination were assessed to predict morphological response (RECIST 1.1) after three T-DM1 cycles and time to treatment failure (TTF).
RESULTS: In the 56 patients analyzed, 29% had negative HER2-PET/CT while intrapatient heterogeneity (patterns B and C) was found in 46% of patients. Compared to RECIST1.1, respective NPV/PPV for HER2-PET/CT were 88%/72% and 83%/96% for early FDG-PET/CT. Combining HER2-PET/CT and FDG-PET/CT accurately predicted morphological response (PPV and NPV:100%) and discriminated patients with a median TTF of only 2.8 months (n=12, 95% CI: 1.4-7.6) from those with a TTF of 15 months (n=25, 95% CI: 9.7-not calculable) CONCLUSIONS: Pre-treatment imaging of HER2-targeting, combined with early metabolic response assessment holds great promise for improving the understanding of tumor heterogeneity in mBC and for selecting patients who will/ will not benefit from T-DM1.

PMID: 26598545 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Reply to the letter to the editor ‘The ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scaling Tool: from theory to practice’ by Hartmann and the letter ‘Comment on ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale’ by Muhonen et al.

Reply to the letter to the editor ‘The ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scaling Tool: from theory to practice’ by Hartmann and the letter ‘Comment on ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale’ by Muhonen et al.
Ann Oncol. 20… Continue reading

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Long-term Exposure to Circulating Platinum is Associated with Late Effects of Treatment in Testicular Cancer Survivors.

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Long-term Exposure to Circulating Platinum is Associated with Late Effects of Treatment in Testicular Cancer Survivors.

Ann Oncol. 2015 Sep 7;

Authors: Boer H, Proost JH, Nuver J, Bunskoek S, Gietema JQ, Geubels BM, Altena R, Zwart N, Oosting SF, Vonk JM, Lefrandt JD, Uges DR, Meijer C, de Vries EG, Gietema JA

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The success of cisplatin-based chemotherapy for testicular cancer comes at the price of long-term and late effects related to healthy tissue damage. We assessed and modelled serum platinum (Pt) decay after chemotherapy and determined relationships between long-term circulating Pt levels and known late effects.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 99 testicular cancer survivors, treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, serum and 24-hour urine samples were collected during follow-up (1-13 years after treatment). To build a population pharmacokinetic model, measured Pt data were simultaneously analysed, together with cisplatin dose, age, weight and height using NONMEM software. Based on this model, area under the curve between 1 and 3 years after treatment (Pt AUC 1-3 years) was calculated for each patient. Predicted long-term Pt exposure was related to renal function and to late effects of treatment assessed median 9 (3-15) years after chemotherapy.
RESULTS: Decay of Pt was best described by a two-compartment model. Mean terminal T1/2 was 3.7 (range 2.5 – 5.2) years. Pt AUC 1-3 years correlated with cumulative cisplatin dose, creatinine clearance before and 1 year after treatment. Patients with paraesthesia had higher Pt AUC 1-3 years (30.9 vs 27.0 µg/L*month) compared to patients without paraesthesia (P=0.021). Patients with hypogonadism, elevated LDL-cholesterol levels or hypertension also had higher Pt AUC 1-3 years.
CONCLUSIONS: Renal function before and after cisplatin treatment is an important determinant of long-term Pt exposure. Known long-term effects of testicular cancer treatment such as paraesthesia, hypogonadism, hypercholesterolaemia, and hypertension are associated with long-term circulating Pt exposure.

PMID: 26347114 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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A randomized phase II study comparing paclitaxel-carboplatin-bevacizumab with or without nitroglycerin patches in patients with stage IV non-squamous-non-small cell lung cancer: NVALT 12 (NCT01171170).

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A randomized phase II study comparing paclitaxel-carboplatin-bevacizumab with or without nitroglycerin patches in patients with stage IV non-squamous-non-small cell lung cancer: NVALT 12 (NCT01171170).

Ann Oncol. 2015 Sep 7;

Authors: Dingemans AC, Groen HJ, Herder GJ, Stigt JA, Smit EF, Bahce I, Burgers JA, van den Borne BE, Biesma B, Vincent A, van der Noort V, Aerts JG, NVALT study group

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Nitroglycerine (NTG) increases tumor blood flow and oxygenation by inhibiting hypoxia-inducible-factor (HIF)-1. A randomized phase II study has shown improved outcome when NTG patches were added to vinorelbine/cisplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition there is evidence that the combination of bevacizumab and HIF 1 inhibitors increases anti-tumor activity.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this randomized phase II trial chemo-naive patients with stage IV non-squamous NSCLC were randomized to 4 cycles of carboplatin (AUC6)-paclitaxel (200 mg/m2)-bevacizumab 15 mg/kg on day 1 every 3 weeks with or without NTG patches 15 mg (day -2 to+2) followed by bevacizumab with or without NTG until progression. Response was assessed every 2 cycles. Primary endpoint was progression free survival (PFS). The study was powered (80%) to detect a decrease in the hazard of tumor progression of 33% at α=0.05 with a two-sided log rank test when 222 pts were enrolled and followed until 195 events were observed.
RESULTS: Between 01-2011 and 01-2013 223 patients were randomized; 112 control arm and 111 experimental arm; Response rate was 54% in control arm and 38% in experimental arm. Median (95% CI) PFS in control arm was 6.8 months (5.6-7.3) and 5.1 months (4.2-5.8) in experimental arm, HR 1.27 (95% CI 0.96-1.67). Overall survival (OS) was 11.6 months (8.8-13.6) in control arm and 9.4 months (7.8-11.3) in experimental arm, HR 1.02 (95% CI 0.71-1.46). In the experimental arm no additional toxicity was observed except headache (6% versus 52% in patients treated with NTG).
CONCLUSION: Adding NTG to first line carboplatin-paclitaxel-bevacizumab did not improve PFS and OS in patients with stage IV non-squamous NSCLC.

PMID: 26347109 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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A phase I trial combining carboplatin/doxorubicin with tocilizumab, an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody, and interferon-α 2b in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer.

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A phase I trial combining carboplatin/doxorubicin with tocilizumab, an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody, and interferon-α 2b in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer.

Ann Oncol. 2015 Jul 27;

Authors: Dijkgraaf EM, Santegoets SJ, Reyners AK, Goedemans R, Wouters MC, Kenter GG, van Erkel AR, van Poelgeest MI, Nijman HW, van der Hoeven JJ, Welters MJ, van der Burg SH, Kroep JR

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The immune system is important in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Interleukin-6 is associated with chemoresistance and an immune-suppressive tumor microenvironment. We investigated whether a combination of chemotherapeutics, blockade of IL-6 receptor (IL-6R; tocilizumab) and immune enhancer interferon-α (Pegintron) is feasible, safe and able to enhance immunity in patients with recurrent EOC.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this dose-escalation study, patients received tocilizumab 1, 2, 4, or 8mg/kg i.v., q4 weeks during the first three cycles of carboplatin (AUC5) plus doxorubicin (pelgylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) 30mg/m(2) or doxorubicin 50mg/m(2) i.v., day 1, q4 weeks, for six cycles). At the highest tocilizumab dose (8mg/kg), Pegintron (1µg/kg s.c.) was added. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected for immunomonitoring at baseline, after three and six cycles. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), CA-125, and radiologic response were evaluated.
RESULTS: In the 23 patients enrolled, no DLT was established. The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events (CTCAE v4·03) were neutropenia (23%), febrile neutropenia (19%) and ileus (19%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. Using CT evaluation, eleven of 21 evaluable patients responded, six had stable disease and three progressive disease. Patients receiving highest-dose tocilizumab showed a functional blockade of IL-6R with increased levels of serum IL-6 (p=0·02) and soluble IL-6R (p=0·008). Consequently, immune cells displayed decreased levels of pSTAT3, myeloid cells produced more IL-12 and IL-1β while T-cells were more activated and secreted higher amounts of effector cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α. An increase in sIL-6R was potentially associated with a survival benefit (p=0·03).
CONCLUSIONS: Functional IL-6R blocking is feasible and safe in EOC patients treated with carboplatin/(pegylated liposomal)doxorubicin, using 8mg/kg tocilizumab. This combination is recommended for phase 2 evaluation based on immune parameters.
CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTER: NCT01637532.

PMID: 26216383 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Refined diagnostic criteria and classification of mast cell leukemia (MCL) and myelomastocytic leukemia (MML): a consensus proposal.

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Refined diagnostic criteria and classification of mast cell leukemia (MCL) and myelomastocytic leukemia (MML): a consensus proposal.

Ann Oncol. 2014 Sep;25(9):1691-700

Authors: Valent P, Sotlar K, Sperr WR, Escribano L, Yavuz S, Reiter A, George TI, Kluin-Nelemans HC, Hermine O, Butterfield JH, Hägglund H, Ustun C, Hornick JL, Triggiani M, Radia D, Akin C, Hartmann K, Gotlib J, Schwartz LB, Verstovsek S, Orfao A, Metcalfe DD, Arock M, Horny HP

Abstract
Mast cell leukemia (MCL), the leukemic manifestation of systemic mastocytosis (SM), is characterized by leukemic expansion of immature mast cells (MCs) in the bone marrow (BM) and other internal organs; and a poor prognosis. In a subset of patients, circulating MCs are detectable. A major differential diagnosis to MCL is myelomastocytic leukemia (MML). Although criteria for both MCL and MML have been published, several questions remain concerning terminologies and subvariants. To discuss open issues, the EU/US-consensus group and the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) launched a series of meetings and workshops in 2011-2013. Resulting discussions and outcomes are provided in this article. The group recommends that MML be recognized as a distinct condition defined by mastocytic differentiation in advanced myeloid neoplasms without evidence of SM. The group also proposes that MCL be divided into acute MCL and chronic MCL, based on the presence or absence of C-Findings. In addition, a primary (de novo) form of MCL should be separated from secondary MCL that typically develops in the presence of a known antecedent MC neoplasm, usually aggressive SM (ASM) or MC sarcoma. For MCL, an imminent prephase is also proposed. This prephase represents ASM with rapid progression and 5%-19% MCs in BM smears, which is generally accepted to be of prognostic significance. We recommend that this condition be termed ASM in transformation to MCL (ASM-t). The refined classification of MCL fits within and extends the current WHO classification; and should improve prognostication and patient selection in practice as well as in clinical trials.

PMID: 24675021 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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A standardised, generic, validated approach to stratify the magnitude of clinical benefit that can be anticipated from anti-cancer therapies: The European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS).

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A standardised, generic, validated approach to stratify the magnitude of clinical benefit that can be anticipated from anti-cancer therapies: The European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-M… Continue reading

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Reply to the letter to the editor ‘Potential clinical relevant drug-drug interactions: comparison between different compendia, do we have a validated method?’ by Conde-Estévez et al.

Reply to the letter to the editor ‘Potential clinical relevant drug-drug interactions: comparison between different compendia, do we have a validated method?’ by Conde-Estévez et al.

Ann Oncol. 2015 Apr 6;

Authors: van Leeuwen RW, Mathijssen RH, Jansman FG, van Gelder T

PMID: 25846553 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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P1.03Analysis of Biomarkers and PK Modeling of ABT-767 in Patients With BRCA1/BRCA2-Mutated Tumors or High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer.

P1.03Analysis of Biomarkers and PK Modeling of ABT-767 in Patients With BRCA1/BRCA2-Mutated Tumors or High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer.
Ann Oncol. 2015 Mar;26(suppl 2):ii16
Authors: de Jonge M, van Herpen C, Gietema … Continue reading

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Variation in causes of death in patients with non-small cell lung cancer according to stage and time since diagnosis.

Variation in causes of death in patients with non-small cell lung cancer according to stage and time since diagnosis.

Ann Oncol. 2015 Feb 11;

Authors: Janssen-Heijnen ML, van Erning FN, De Ruysscher DK, Coebergh JW, Groen HJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) die within the first few years after diagnosis, and significant excess mortality remains beyond 5 years. We investigated death rates and the distribution of causes of death for NSCLC patients by age and stage at diagnosis during long-term follow-up.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: All 72,021 patients aged 45-89 years diagnosed with stage I-III NSCLC between 1989 and 2008 in the Netherlands and who died up till 2011 were derived from the Netherlands Cancer Registry and linked with the database of Statistics Netherlands for underlying cause of death. Mortality ratios and proportional distribution of causes of death were calculated during 5 time periods after diagnosis of NSCLC (up to 15 years).
RESULTS: Median follow-up was 9.6 years (range 0-23 years). Lung cancer was the predominant cause of death in the first 6 years after diagnosis (being 80-85% and ∼90% up to 3 years for localized and locally-advanced disease, respectively, and ∼60-75% and ∼75-85% during years 4-6 for both stage groups, respectively). Thereafter, lung cancer as cause of death proportionally decreased with time since diagnosis, but remained over 30%. Hence, cardiovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) became more important causes of death, especially for patients aged >60 years at diagnosis (up to 34% for cardiovascular diseases and up to 19% for COPD).
CONCLUSIONS: With time the relative contribution of cardiovascular and COPD causes of death increased, although the absolute contribution of lung cancer remained high in non-metastatic NSCLC. Therefore, managing morbidity of these diseases remains relevant.

PMID: 25672893 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Drug-drug interactions in patients treated for cancer: a prospective study on clinical interventions.

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Drug-drug interactions in patients treated for cancer: a prospective study on clinical interventions.

Ann Oncol. 2015 Jan 26;

Authors: van…

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Doxorubicin-based adjuvant chemotherapy in soft tissue sarcoma: pooled analysis of two STBSG-EORTC phase III clinical trials.

Doxorubicin-based adjuvant chemotherapy in soft tissue sarcoma: pooled analysis of two STBSG-EORTC phase III clinical trials.
Ann Oncol. 2014 Oct 6;
Authors: Le Cesne A, Ouali M, Leahy MG, Santoro A, Hoekstra HJ, Hoh… Continue reading

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Newly diagnosed and relapsed mantle cell lymphoma: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up†.

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Newly diagnosed and relapsed mantle cell lymphoma: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up†.

Ann Oncol. 2014 Sep;25 Suppl 3:iii83-iii92

Authors: Dreyling M, Geisler C, Hermine O, Kluin-Nelemans HC, Le Gouill S, Rule S, Shpilberg O, Walewski J, Ladetto M, ESMO Guidelines Working Group

PMID: 25210087 [PubMed – in process]

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Response to chemotherapy is not related to chromosome instability in synovial sarcoma.

Response to chemotherapy is not related to chromosome instability in synovial sarcoma.

Ann Oncol. 2014 Jul 28;

Authors: Chakiba C, Lagarde P, Pissaloux D, Neuville A, Brulard C, Pérot G, Coindre JM, Terrier P, Ranchere-Vince D, Ferrari A, Collini P, Suurmeijer AJ, Blay JY, Aarab Terrisse S, Piperno-Neumann S, Averous G, Bui B, Orbach D, Italiano A, Chibon F

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is an aggressive soft-tissue tumor. Despite being considered as a chemosensitive disease, the real impact of peri-operative chemotherapy on metastasis-free survival is controversial. We have shown that metastatic relapse of SS is strongly associated with genomic complexity. There are no data regarding the potential correlation between genomic complexity and response to chemotherapy.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study population included 65 SS patients diagnosed between 1991 and 2013 and with available tissue material. Genomic profiling was performed by using array-CGH. 45 SS out of the 65 patients were treated with neoadjuvant anthracycline/ifosfamide-based chemotherapy. Radiological response was assessed according to RECIST criteria. Histological response was defined by the percentage of recognizable tumor cells on the surgical specimen.
RESULTS: Genomic complexity was significantly associated with metastasis-free survival. However, there was no statistically significant association between radiological or histological response and genomic complexity.
CONCLUSION: The absence of significant association between response to chemotherapy and genomic complexity suggests that the prognostic value of chromosome instability in SS is independent of response to chemotherapy; mechanisms leading to metastatic relapse of SS are intrinsic to the biology of the tumor and current cytotoxic drugs are only poorly efficient to prevent it.

PMID: 25070544 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Diabetes in relation to breast cancer relapse and all-cause mortality in elderly breast cancer patients: a FOCUS study analysis.

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Diabetes in relation to breast cancer relapse and all-cause mortality in elderly breast cancer patients: a FOCUS study analysis.

Ann Oncol. 2013 Dec;24(12):3011-6

Authors: Kiderlen M, de Glas NA, Bastiaannet E, Engels CC, van de Water W, de Craen AJ, Portielje JE, van de Velde CJ, Liefers GJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: In developed countries, 40% of breast cancer patients are >65 years of age at diagnosis, of whom 16% additionally suffer from diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of diabetes on relapse-free period (RFP) and overall mortality in elderly breast cancer patients.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were selected from the retrospective FOCUS cohort, which contains detailed information of elderly breast cancer patients. RFP was calculated using Fine and Gray competing risk regression models for patients with diabetes versus patients without diabetes. Overall survival was calculated by Cox regression models, in which patients were divided into four groups: no comorbidity, diabetes only, diabetes and other comorbidity or other comorbidity without diabetes.
RESULTS: Overall, 3124 patients with non-metastasized breast cancer were included. RFP was better for patients with diabetes compared with patients without diabetes (multivariable HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.59-1.01), irrespective of other comorbidity and most evident in patients aged ≥75 years (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.45-0.98). The overall survival was similar for patients with diabetes only compared with patients without comorbidity (HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.45-0.98), while patients with diabetes and additional comorbidity had the worst overall survival (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.44-2.01).
CONCLUSION: When taking competing mortality into account, RFP was better in elderly breast cancer patients with diabetes compared with patients without diabetes. Moreover, patients with diabetes without other comorbidity had a similar overall survival as patients without any comorbidity. Possibly, unfavourable effects of (complications of) diabetes on overall survival are counterbalanced by beneficial effects of metformin on the occurrence of breast cancer recurrences.

PMID: 24026538 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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A randomized, double-blind, phase II study of erlotinib with or without sunitinib for the second-line treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

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A randomized, double-blind, phase II study of erlotinib with or without sunitinib for the second-line treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Ann Oncol. 2013 Sep;24(9):2382-9
Autho… Continue reading

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48p * different tumor biology in Russian and dutch patients with breast cancer stage I.

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48p * different tumor biology in Russian and dutch patients with breast cancer stage I.
Ann Oncol. 2014 May;25 Suppl 1:i15-i16
Authors: Kolyadina IV, Kuppen PJ, van de Velde CJ, Poddubnaya IV, Dekker-… Continue reading

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A comparison of carboplatin and paclitaxel with cisplatinum and 5-fluorouracil in definitive chemoradiation in esophageal cancer patients.

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A comparison of carboplatin and paclitaxel with cisplatinum and 5-fluorouracil in definitive chemoradiation in esophageal cancer patients.

Ann Oncol. 2014 Feb 2;

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Evaluation of short-course radiotherapy followed by neoadjuvant bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin and subsequent radical surgical treatment in primary stage IV rectal cancer.

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Evaluation of short-course radiotherapy followed by neoadjuvant bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin and subsequent radical surgical treatment in primary stage IV rectal cancer.

Ann Oncol. 2013 Jul;24(7):1762-9

Authors: van Dijk TH, Tamas K, Beukema JC, Beets GL, Gelderblom AJ, de Jong KP, Nagtegaal ID, Rutten HJ, van de Velde CJ, Wiggers T, Hospers GA, Havenga K

Abstract
BACKGROUND: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of preoperative short-course radiotherapy followed by capecitabine and oxaliplatin treatment in combination with bevacizumab and subsequent radical surgical treatment of all tumor sites in patients with stage IV rectal cancer.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Adults with primary metastasized rectal cancer were enrolled. They received radiotherapy (5 × 5 Gy) followed by bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg, day 1) and oxaliplatin (130 mg/m(2), day 1) intravenously and capecitabine (1000 mg/m(2) twice daily orally, days 1-14) for up to six cycles. Surgery was carried out 6-8 weeks after the last bevacizumab dose. The percentage of radical surgical treatment, 2-year survival and recurrence rates, and treatment-related toxicity was evaluated.
RESULTS: Of 50 included patients, 42 (84%) had liver metastases, 5 (10%) lung metastases, and 3 (6%) both liver and lung metastases. Radical surgical treatment was possible in 36 (72%) patients. The 2-year overall survival rate was 80% [95% confidence interval (CI) 66.3%-90.0%]. The 2-year recurrence rate was 64% (95% CI 49.8%-84.5%). Toxic effects were tolerable. No treatment-related deaths occurred.
CONCLUSIONS: Radical surgical treatment of all tumor sites carried out after short-course radiotherapy, and bevacizumab-capecitabine-oxaliplatin combination therapy is a feasible and potentially curative approach in primary metastasized rectal cancer.

PMID: 23524865 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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ESMO Consensus conferences: guidelines on malignant lymphoma. part 2: marginal zone lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

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ESMO Consensus conferences: guidelines on malignant lymphoma. part 2: marginal zone lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

Ann Oncol. 2013 Apr;24(4):857-77

Authors: Dreyling M, Thieblemont C, Gallamini A, Arcaini L, Campo E, Hermine O, Kluin-Nelemans JC, Ladetto M, Le Gouill S, Iannitto E, Pileri S, Rodriguez J, Schmitz N, Wotherspoon A, Zinzani P, Zucca E

Abstract
To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organizes consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. In this setting, a consensus conference on the management of lymphoma was held on 18 June 2011 in Lugano, next to the 11th International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma. The conference convened ∼30 experts from all around Europe, and selected six lymphoma entities to be addressed; for each of them, three to five open questions were to be addressed by the experts. For each question, a recommendation should be given by the panel, referring to the strength of the recommendation based on the level of evidence. This consensus report focuses on the three less common lymphoproliferative malignancies: marginal zone lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, and peripheral T-cell lymphomas. A first report had focused on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

PMID: 23425945 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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