Category Archives: Int J Sports Med

Correction: Increase in the Acute:Chronic Workload Ratio relates to Injury Risk in Competitive Runners.

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Correction: Increase in the Acute:Chronic Workload Ratio relates to Injury Risk in Competitive Runners.
Int J Sports Med. 2020 Jul 29;:
Authors: Dijkhuis TB, Otter R, Aiello M, Velthuijsen H, Lemmi… Continue reading

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Increase in the Acute:Chronic Workload Ratio relates to Injury Risk in Competitive Runners.

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Increase in the Acute:Chronic Workload Ratio relates to Injury Risk in Competitive Runners.
Int J Sports Med. 2020 Jun 02;:
Authors: Dijkhuis TB, Otter R, Aiello M, Velthuijsen H, Lemmink K
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Jump Landing Characteristics Predicts Lower Extremity Injuries in Indoor Team Sports.

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Jump Landing Characteristics Predicts Lower Extremity Injuries in Indoor Team Sports.

Int J Sports Med. 2015 Nov 17;

Authors: van der Does HT, Brink MS, Benjaminse A, Visscher C, Lemmink KA

Abstract
The aim of this study is to investigate the predictive value of landing stability and technique to gain insight into risk factors for ankle and knee injuries in indoor team sport players. Seventy-five male and female basketball, volleyball or korfball players were screened by measuring landing stability after a single-leg jump landing and landing technique during a repeated counter movement jump by detailed 3-dimensional kinematics and kinetics. During the season 11 acute ankle injuries were reported along with 6 acute and 7 overuse knee injuries by the teams’ physical therapist. Logistic regression analysis showed less landing stability in the forward and diagonal jump direction (OR 1.01-1.10, p≤0.05) in players who sustained an acute ankle injury. Furthermore landing technique with a greater ankle dorsiflexion moment increased the risk for acute ankle injury (OR 2.16, p≤0.05). A smaller knee flexion moment and greater vertical ground reaction force increased the risk of an overuse knee injury (OR 0.29 and 1.13 respectively, p≤0.05). Less one-legged landing stability and suboptimal landing technique were shown in players sustaining an acute ankle and overuse knee injury compared to healthy players. Determining both landing stability and technique may further guide injury prevention programs.

PMID: 26575403 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Monitoring Perceived Stress and Recovery in Relation to Cycling Performance in Female Athletes.

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Monitoring Perceived Stress and Recovery in Relation to Cycling Performance in Female Athletes.

Int J Sports Med. 2015 Oct 28;

Authors: Otter…

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Anthropometric Injury Risk Factors in Elite-standard Youth Soccer.

Anthropometric Injury Risk Factors in Elite-standard Youth Soccer.

Int J Sports Med. 2015 Aug 10;

Authors: Kemper GL, van der Sluis A, Brink MS, Visscher C, Frencken WG, Elferink-Gemser MT

Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate whether an increased risk of injury occurrence can be determined through frequent anthropometric measurements in elite-standard youth soccer players. Over the course of one season, we followed 101 male elite-standard youth soccer players between 11 and 19 years of age. Height and body mass were monitored at monthly measurement intervals and fat percentage was assessed every 3 months by use of the sum of skinfold method. Growth in height (cm), alternations in body mass index (kg/m(2)), fat percentage and fat-free mass index (kg/m(2)) were calculated. Injuries were recorded in accordance with the recommendations of the FIFA Consensus Model for Injury Registration. Odds ratio scores and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using binary logistic regression analyses. The following anthropometric injury risk factors were identified: ≥ 0.6 centimeter growth per month (p=0.03; OR=1.63; 95% CI: 1.06-2.52), ≥ 0.3 kg/m(2) increase of body mass index value per month (p=0.03; OR=1.61; 95% CI: 1.04-2.49) and low fat percentage; i. e., < 7% for players aged 11-16 and < 5% for players over 16 years (p=0.01; OR=1.81; 95% CI: 1.18-2.76). Individual monitoring of anthropometrics provides useful information to determine increased risk of injury occurrence in elite-standard youth soccer.

PMID: 26258817 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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A 200-m All-out Front-crawl Swim Modifies Competitive Swimmers’ Shoulder Joint Position Sense.

A 200-m All-out Front-crawl Swim Modifies Competitive Swimmers’ Shoulder Joint Position Sense.

Int J Sports Med. 2015 Aug 7;

Authors: Uematsu A, Kurita Y, Inoue K, Okuno K, Hortobágyi T, Suzuki S

Abstract
We tested the hypothesis that an all-out-effort 200-m front-crawl swim trial affects competitive swimmers’ shoulder joint position sense. On Day 1, we measured shoulder joint position sense before and after the swim trial, and on Day 2 before and after 2 min of seated rest. On both days, shoulder joint position sense was measured in the seated position using electromagnetic movement sensors in a position-matching paradigm. An investigator abducted participants’ left (reference) shoulder joint in the frontal plane to test angles of 90°, 135°, and 180°. Participants then actively abducted the right (indicator) shoulder joint to match the position of the left, reference arm. After the 200-m all-out front-crawl swim trial, the indicator relative to the reference angle differed by 4.4° toward adduction at the 180° (vertical) testing position (P<0.05). Variation in absolute matching error was 3.2° or 2.2 times greater after swim compared with the no-swim control trial. An all-out 200-m front-crawl swim trial can selectively increase competitive swimmers’ shoulder joint position sense error and increase variation in matching error in horizontal arm position.

PMID: 26252553 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Importance of Peak Height Velocity Timing in Terms of Injuries in Talented Soccer Players.

Importance of Peak Height Velocity Timing in Terms of Injuries in Talented Soccer Players.
Int J Sports Med. 2015 May 6;
Authors: van der Sluis A, Elferink-Gemser MT, Brink MS, Visscher C
PMID: 25958940 [PubM… Continue reading

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The Effect of Stress and Recovery on Field-test Performance in Floorball.

The Effect of Stress and Recovery on Field-test Performance in Floorball.

Int J Sports Med. 2015 Mar 3;

Authors: van der Does HT, Brink MS, Visscher C, Huijgen BC, Frencken WG, Lemmink KA

Abstract
Physical and psychosocial stress and recovery are important performance determinants. A holistic approach that monitors these performance determinants over a longer period of time is lacking. Therefore this study aims to investigate the effect of a player’s physical and psychosocial stress and recovery on field-test performance. In a prospective non-experimental cohort design 10 female Dutch floorball players were monitored over 6 months. To monitor physical and psychosocial stress and recovery, daily training-logs and 3-weekly the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes (RESTQ-Sport) were filled out respectively. To determine field-test performance 6 Heart rate Interval Monitoring System (HIMS) and 4 Repeated Modified Agility T-test (RMAT) measurements were performed. Multilevel prediction models were applied to account for within-players and between-players field-test performance changes. The results show that more psychosocial stress and less psychosocial recovery over 3-6 weeks before testing decrease HIMS performance (p≤0.05). More physical stress over 6 weeks before testing improves RMAT performance (p≤0.05). In conclusion, physical and psychosocial stress and recovery affect submaximal interval-based running performance and agility up to 6 weeks before testing. Therefore both physical and psychosocial stress and recovery should be monitored in daily routines to optimize performance.

PMID: 25734914 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Importance of Peak Height Velocity Timing in Terms of Injuries in Talented Soccer Players.

Importance of Peak Height Velocity Timing in Terms of Injuries in Talented Soccer Players.
Int J Sports Med. 2015 Jan 21;
Authors: van der Sluis A, Elferink-Gemser MT, Brink MS, Visscher C
PMID: 25607518 [Pub… Continue reading

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Hand-rim forces and gross mechanical efficiency in asynchronous and synchronous wheelchair propulsion: a comparison.

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Hand-rim forces and gross mechanical efficiency in asynchronous and synchronous wheelchair propulsion: a comparison.

Int J Sports Med. 2014 Mar;35(3):223-31

Authors: Lenton JP, van der Woude L, Fowler N, Nicholson G, Tolfrey K, Goosey-Tolfrey V

Abstract
To compare the force application characteristics at various push frequencies of asynchronous (ASY) and synchronous (SYN) hand-rim propulsion, 8 able-bodied participants performed a separate sub-maximal exercise test on a wheelchair roller ergometer for each propulsion mode. Each test consisted of a series of 5, 4-min exercise blocks at 1.8 m · s-1 – initially at their freely chosen frequency (FCF), followed by four counter-balanced trials at 60, 80, 120 and 140% FCF. Kinetic data was obtained using a SMARTWheel, measuring forces and moments. The gross efficiency (GE) was determined as the ratio of external work done and the total energy expended. The ASY propulsion produced higher force measures for FRES, FTAN, rate of force development & FEF (P<0.05), while there was no difference in GE values (P=0.518). In pair-matched push frequencies (ASY80:SYN60, ASY100:SYN80, ASY120:SYN100 and ASY140:SYN120), ASY propulsion forces remained significantly higher (FRES, FTAN, rate of force development & FEF P<0.05), and there was no significant effect on GE (P=0.456). Both ASY and SYN propulsion demonstrate similar trends: changes in push frequency are accompanied by changes in absolute force even without changes in the gross pattern/trend of force application, FEF or GE. Matched push frequencies continue to produce significant differences in force measures but not GE. This suggests ASY propulsion is the predominant factor in force application differences. The ASY would appear to offer a kinetic disadvantage to SYN propulsion and no physiological advantage under current testing conditions.

PMID: 23945971 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Allometric Multilevel Modelling of Agility and Dribbling Speed by Skeletal Age and Playing Position in Youth Soccer Players.

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Allometric Multilevel Modelling of Agility and Dribbling Speed by Skeletal Age and Playing Position in Youth Soccer Players.

Int J Sports Med. 2014 Apr 15;

Authors: Valente-Dos-Santos J, Coelho-E-Silva MJ, Duarte J, Pereira J, Rebelo-Gonçalves R, Figueiredo A, Mazzuco MA, Sherar LB, Elferink-Gemser MT, Malina RM

Abstract
This study evaluates the contributions of age, skeletal maturation, body size and composition, training and playing position to the development of agility and dribbling speed in young male soccer players (10-18 years) followed longitudinally. 83 players [defenders (n=35), midfielders (n=27), forwards (n=21)] were followed annually over 5 years (average: 4.4 observations per player). Skeletal age (SA), stature, body mass, triceps and subscapular skinfolds, agility and dribbling speed were measured annually. Body composition was estimated from the 2 skinfolds. Annual training volume was estimated from weekly participation forms completed by coaches. The multiplicative allometric models with the best statistical fit showed that statural growth of 1 cm predicts 1.334 s and 1.927 s of improvement in agility and dribbling speed, respectively. Significant independent effects of fat-free mass and annual volume training were found for agility and dribbling speed, respectively (P<0.05). Predicted agility (from 12 to 18 years of SA) and dribbling speed (from 13 to 18 years of SA) differed significantly among players by playing positions (midfielders>forwards>defenders). The present results provide developmental models for the interpretation of intra- and inter-individual variability in agility and dribbling speed among youth soccer players across adolescence, and may provide a framework for trainers and coaches to develop and evaluate individualized training protocols.

PMID: 24920564 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Soccer skill development in talented players.

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Soccer skill development in talented players.
Int J Sports Med. 2013 Aug;34(8):720-6
Authors: Huijgen BC, Elferink-Gemser MT, Ali A, Visscher C
Abstract
The aim of the study was to gain insight… Continue reading

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Jumper’s Knee or Lander’s Knee? A Systematic Review of the Relation between Jump Biomechanics and Patellar Tendinopathy.

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Jumper’s Knee or Lander’s Knee? A Systematic Review of the Relation between Jump Biomechanics and Patellar Tendinopathy.

Int J Sports Med. 2014 Feb 27;

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Sport Injuries Aligned to Peak Height Velocity in Talented Pubertal Soccer Players.

Sport Injuries Aligned to Peak Height Velocity in Talented Pubertal Soccer Players.

Int J Sports Med. 2013 Sep 10;

Authors: van der Sluis A, Elferink-Gemser MT, Coelho-E-Silva MJ,…

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