Category Archives: J Rehabil Med

Validity and feasibility of a temperature sensor for measuring use and non-use of orthopaedic footwear.

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Validity and feasibility of a temperature sensor for measuring use and non-use of orthopaedic footwear.
J Rehabil Med. 2018 Oct 09;:
Authors: Lutjeboer T, van Netten JJ, Postema K, Hijmans JM
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Sports participation after rehabilitation: Barriers and facilitators.

Sports participation after rehabilitation: Barriers and facilitators.

J Rehabil Med. 2015 Nov 4;

Authors: Jaarsma EA, Dekker R, Geertzen JH, Dijkstra P

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Development and testing psychometric properties of an ICF-based health measure: The Neuromuscular Disease Impact Profile.

Development and testing psychometric properties of an ICF-based health measure: The Neuromuscular Disease Impact Profile.

J Rehabil Med. 2015 Feb 13;

Authors: Bos I, Kuks JB, Wynia K

Abstract
Objectives: To develop a measure that is based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and reflects the prevalence and severity of disabilities related to neuromuscular disorders, and to evaluate the psychometric properties of this measure. Methods: A preliminary questionnaire was developed, based on the categories of the ICF Core Set for Neuromuscular Diseases. Next a cross-sectional postal survey was carried out among 702 patients (70% response rate) diagnosed with a neuromuscular disease. Finally, psychometric properties were examined. Results: The preliminary Neuromuscular Disease Impact Profile (NMDIP) consisted of 45 items. Factor analysis showed that the NMDIP comprised domains representing 3 ICF-components: 5 factors in the Body Functions component, 2 factors in the Activities component, and 1 factor in the Participation component. Scales showed moderate to good internal consistency (α = 0.63-0.92) and mean inter-item correlation coefficients (0.38-0.77). Convergent and discriminant validity analysis indicated that the NMDIP measures the impact of neuromuscular disease on physical, mental, and social functioning. The NMDIP discriminates between groups who differ in extent of limitations. Conclusion: The NMDIP is an ICF-based measure that reflects neuromuscular disease-related disabilities. It consists of 36 items divided over 8 scales with satisfactory psychometric properties and 4 single items.

PMID: 25679115 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Adaptive devices in young people with upper limb reduction deficiencies: Use and satisfaction.

Adaptive devices in young people with upper limb reduction deficiencies: Use and satisfaction.

J Rehabil Med. 2015 Feb 12;

Authors: Vasluian E, van Wijk I, Dijkstra PU, Reinders-Messelink HA, van der Sluis CK

Abstract
Objective: To evaluate use of, satisfaction with, and social adjustment with adaptive devices compared with prostheses in young people with upper limb reduction deficiencies. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 218 young people with upper limb reduction deficiencies (age range 2-20 years) and their parents. A questionnaire was used to evaluate participants’ characteristics, difficulties encountered, and preferred solutions for activities, use satisfaction, and social adjustment with adaptive devices vs prostheses. The Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology and a subscale of Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales were used. Results: Of 218 participants, 58% were boys, 87% had transversal upper limb reduction deficiencies, 76% with past/present use of adaptive devices and 37% with past/present use of prostheses. Young people (> 50%) had difficulties in performing activities. Of 360 adaptive devices, 43% were used for self-care (using cutlery), 28% for mobility (riding a bicycle) and 5% for leisure activities. Prostheses were used for self-care (4%), mobility (9%), communication (3%), recreation and leisure (6%) and work/employment (4%). The preferred solution for difficult activities was using unaffected and affected arms/hands and other body parts (> 60%), adaptive devices (< 48%) and prostheses (< 9%). Satisfaction and social adjustment with adaptive devices were greater than with prostheses (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Young people with upper limb reduction deficiencies are satisfied and socially well-adjusted with adaptive devices. Adaptive devices are good alternatives to prostheses.

PMID: 25678192 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Wheelchair-specific fitness of inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury.

Wheelchair-specific fitness of inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury.

J Rehabil Med. 2015 Jan 16;

Authors: van der Scheer JW, de Groot S, Tepper M, Gobets D, Veeger DH, van der Woude LH

Abstract
Objectives: To describe wheelchair-specific anaerobic work capacity, isometric strength and peak aerobic work capacity of physically inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury using outcomes of tests that are feasible for use in rehabilitation centres, and to determine associations among these fitness components. Design: Cross-sectional study. Participants: Manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury for at least 10 years, who were inactive based on a norm score of a physical activity questionnaire (n = 29; 22 men; 20 with paraplegia; median age 53 years). Methods: Participants performed 3 exercise tests in their own wheelchair to determine: highest 5-s power output over 15-m overground sprinting (P5-15m); highest 3-s isometric push-force (Fiso); and peak power output (POpeak) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) over a peak test. Results: Median (interquartile range) was in P5-15m 16.1 W (9.4-20.9); in Fiso 399 N (284-610); in POpeak 40.9 W (19.1-54.9); and in VO2peak 1.26 l/min (0.80-1.67). Correlations among outcomes of fitness components were weak (r = 0.50-0.67, p < 0.01), except for P5-15m with POpeak (r = 0.79, p < 0.001). Conclusion: All fitness components measured in this sample were at relatively low levels, implying a specific need for interventions to improve wheelchair-specific fitness. The weak-to-moderate associations among components imply that separate tests should be used when monitoring wheelchair-specific fitness in rehabilitation centres.

PMID: 25594246 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Predictors of return to work 5 years after discharge for wheelchair-dependent individuals with spinal cord injury.

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Predictors of return to work 5 years after discharge for wheelchair-dependent individuals with spinal cord injury.

J Rehabil Med. 2014 Aug 28;

Authors: Ferdiana A, Post MW, van deGroot S, Bültmann U, van der Klink JJ

Abstract
Objectives: To examine the employment situation and predictors of return to work for individuals with spinal cord injury 5 years after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Design: Prospective cohort study. Subjects: A total of 114 subjects who were employed before the injury and who completed a 5-year follow-up. Methods: Work was defined as having paid work ≥ 1 h/week or ≥ 12 h/week. Predictors of return to work were identified using logistic regression analysis. Demographic, injury-related, pre-injury work factors and self-efficacy were measured at the start of rehabilitation and at discharge. Results: Return to work rates for ≥ 1 and ≥ 12 h/week were 50.9% and 42.6%, respectively. Median time to return to work was 13 months. Compared with before injury, participants worked for fewer hours per week and had occupations of lower physical intensity. The majority had a supplementary income. Those who returned to work were financially better-off than those who did not. Only 40% of participants received return to work support. A high/middle level occupation was associated with higher odds of return to work ≥ 1 h/week (odds ratio (OR) = 2.39, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.07-5.30). Low physical intensity of pre-injury occupation was significantly associated with higher odds of return to work ≥ 1 h/week (OR = 3.01, 95% CI = 1.31-6.91) and ≥ 12 h/week (OR = 2.67, 95% CI = 1.18-5.96). After adjustment for potential confounders, these associations were no longer significant. Conclusion: Return to work after spinal cord injury was relatively high in this study, but entailed considerable changes in the employment situation, especially reduced working hours and less physically intense occupations. Rehabilitation interventions should enhance the skills and qualifications of individuals with physically-demanding pre-injury work in order to improve access to suitable jobs after spinal cord injury. Interventions should focus not only on return to work, but also on the quality of employment, including opportunities to pursue full-time work.

PMID: 25167341 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Functional performance, participation and autonomy after discharge from prosthetic rehabilitation: Barriers, facilitators and outcomes.

Functional performance, participation and autonomy after discharge from prosthetic rehabilitation: Barriers, facilitators and outcomes.
J Rehabil Med. 2014 Jul 30;
Authors: van Twillert S, Stuive I, Geertzen JH, Post… Continue reading

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Learning effects of repetitive administration of the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure in novice prosthetic users.

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Learning effects of repetitive administration of the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure in novice prosthetic users.

J Rehabil Med. 2014 May 21;

Authors: Vasluian E, Bongers RM, Reinders-Messelink HA, Burgerhof JG, Dijkstra PU, van der Sluis CK

Abstract
Objective: The Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) evaluates the functionality of normal, injured or prosthetic hands. The aim was to evaluate the learning effects of SHAP tasks and the appropriateness of the time limits applied per task in novice prosthetic users. Methods: Right-handed unimpaired volunteers (n = 24, mean age 21.8 years) completed 8 SHAP sessions over 5 consecutive days using a prosthetic simulator. The execution times of SHAP tasks were transformed into 6 prehensile patterns, the functionality profile, and the index of function, a general functionality score. Learning effects in task times were analysed using multilevel analysis. Results: Learning effects occurred in all SHAP tasks. Tasks, sex, sessions, tasks-sessions interaction, and the first session of the day contributed (p < 0.01) to the execution times. Tasks were performed more slowly by females and more slowly on the first session of the day. In several tasks time limits were exceeded by > 25% of participants in at least the first 3 sessions, which affected the calculation of the functionality profile and index of function scores. Conclusion: The learning effects of SHAP in novice prosthetic users require consideration when conducting a reliability study. SHAP scores in novice prosthetic-hand users are confounded by learning effects and exceeded time limits.

PMID: 24850374 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Self-reported fatigue and physical function in late mid-life.

Self-reported fatigue and physical function in late mid-life.

J Rehabil Med. 2014 May 8;

Authors: Boter H, Mänty M, Hansen AM, Hortobágyi T, Avlund K

Abstract
Objective: To determine the association between the 5 subscales of the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) and physical function in late mid-life. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: A population-based sample of adults who participated in the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank population cohort (n = 4,964; age 49-63 years). Methods: Self-reported fatigue was measured using the MFI-20 comprising: general fatigue, physical fatigue, reduced activity, reduced motivation, and mental fatigue. Handgrip strength and chair rise tests were used as measures of physical function. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine the associations between handgrip strength and the chair rise test with the MFI-20 subscales, adjusted for potential confounders. Results: After adjustments for potential confounders, handgrip strength was associated with physical fatigue (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.75 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66-0.86); p ≤ 0.001) and reduced motivation (adjusted OR 0.85 (95% CI 0.75-0.96); p ≤ 0.05), but not with the other subscales. After these adjustments, the chair rise test was associated with physical fatigue (adjusted OR 0.61 (0.53-0.69); p ≤ 0.001), general fatigue (adjusted OR 0.72 (0.62-0.84); p ≤ 0.001), reduced activity (adjusted OR 0.79 (0.70-0.90); p ≤ 0.001) and reduced motivation (adjusted OR 0.84 (0.74-0.95); p ≤ 0.01), but not with mental fatigue. Subgroup analyses for sex did not show statistically significant different associations between physical function and fatigue. Conclusion: The present study supports the physiological basis of 4 subscales of the MFI-20. The association between fatigue and function was independent of gender.

PMID: 24819423 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Stump sensibility in children with upper limb reduction deficiency.

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Stump sensibility in children with upper limb reduction deficiency.

J Rehabil Med. 2014 Jan;46(1):51-8

Authors: Reinkingh M, Reinders-Messelink HA, Dijkstra PU, Maathuis KG, van der Sluis CK

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To compare stump sensibility in children with upper limb reduction deficiency with sensibility of the unaffected arm and hand. In addition, to evaluate the associations between stump sensibility, stump length and activity level.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.
SUBJECTS: Children and young adults aged 6-25 years with upper limb reduction deficiency.
METHODS: Threshold of touch was measured with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, stereognosis was measured with the Shape-Texture Identification test and kinaesthesia and activity level was measured with the Child Amputee Prosthetics Project – Functional Status Inventory and the Prosthetic Upper Extremity Functional Index.
RESULTS: A total of 31 children with upper limb reduction deficiency (mean age 15 years, 3 prosthesis wearers) were investigated. The threshold of touch of the stump circumference was lower (indicating higher sensibility) than of the unaffected arm (p = 0.006), hand (p = 0.004) and stump end-point (p = < 0.001). Long stumps had higher threshold of touch (indicating lower sensibility) than short stumps (p = 0.046). Twenty-nine children recognized 1 or more shapes or textures with the stump. Kinaesthesia in the affected and unaffected sides was comparable. Sensibility was not correlated with activity level.
CONCLUSION: Threshold of touch, stereognosis and kinaesthesia of the affected sides were excellent. Threshold of touch of the stump circumference was lower (indicating higher sensibility) than of the unaffected arm and hand. High stump sensibility may clarify good functioning in the children without prostheses and contribute to prosthesis rejection.

PMID: 24036887 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Rehabilitation in skilled nursing centres for elderly people with lower limb amputations: a mixed-methods, descriptive study.

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Rehabilitation in skilled nursing centres for elderly people with lower limb amputations: a mixed-methods, descriptive study.
J Rehabil Med. 2013 Nov;45(10):1065-70
Authors: Fortington LV, Rommers GM, Wind-Kra… Continue reading

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Change in health-related quality of life in the first 18 months after lower limb amputation: a prospective, longitudinal study.

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Change in health-related quality of life in the first 18 months after lower limb amputation: a prospective, longitudinal study.

J Rehabil Med. 2013…

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Activity and participation of children and adolescents with unilateral congenital below elbow deficiency: an online focus group study.

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Activity and participation of children and adolescents with unilateral congenital below elbow deficiency: an online focus group study.

J Rehabil Med. 2012…

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