Category Archives: Int J Public Health

Why don’t segregated Roma do more for their health? An explanatory framework from an ethnographic study in Slovakia.

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Why don’t segregated Roma do more for their health? An explanatory framework from an ethnographic study in Slovakia.

Int J Public Health. 2018 Jun 16;:

Authors: Belak A, Madarasova Geckova A, van Dijk JP, Reijneveld SA

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The health status of segregated Roma is poor. To understand why segregated Roma engage in health-endangering practices, we explored their nonadherence to clinical and public health recommendations.
METHODS: We examined one segregated Roma settlement of 260 inhabitants in Slovakia. To obtain qualitative data on local-level mechanisms supporting Roma nonadherence, we combined ethnography and systematic interviewing over 10 years. We then performed a qualitative content analysis based on sociological and public health theories.
RESULTS: Our explanatory framework summarizes how the nonadherence of local Roma was supported by an interlocked system of seven mechanisms, controlled by and operating through both local Roma and non-Roma. These regard the Roma situation of poverty, segregation and substandard infrastructure; the Roma socialization into their situation; the Roma-perceived value of Roma alternative practices; the exclusionary non-Roma and self-exclusionary Roma ideologies; the discrimination, racism and dysfunctional support towards Roma by non-Roma; and drawbacks in adherence.
CONCLUSIONS: Non-Roma ideologies, internalized by Roma into a racialized ethnic identity through socialization, and drawbacks in adherence might present powerful, yet neglected, mechanisms supporting segregated Roma nonadherence.

PMID: 29909522 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Test-retest reliability of the scale of participation in organized activities among adolescents in the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Test-retest reliability of the scale of participation in organized activities among adolescents in the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Int J Public Health. 2015 Oct 8;

Authors: Bosakova L, Kolarcik P, Bobakova D, Sulcova M, Van Dijk JP, Reijneveld SA, Geckova AM

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Participation in organized activities is related with a range of positive outcomes, but the way such participation is measured has not been scrutinized. Test-retest reliability as an important indicator of a scale’s reliability has been assessed rarely and for “The scale of participation in organized activities” lacks completely. This test-retest study is based on the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study and is consistent with its methodology.
METHODS: We obtained data from 353 Czech (51.9 % boys) and 227 Slovak (52.9 % boys) primary school pupils, grades five and nine, who participated in this study in 2013. We used Cohen’s kappa statistic and single measures of the intraclass correlation coefficient to estimate the test-retest reliability of all selected items in the sample, stratified by gender, age and country.
RESULTS: We mostly observed a large correlation between the test and retest in all of the examined variables (κ ranged from 0.46 to 0.68). Test-retest reliability of the sum score of individual items showed substantial agreement (ICC = 0.64).
CONCLUSIONS: The scale of participation in organized activities has an acceptable level of agreement, indicating good reliability.

PMID: 26450577 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Determinants of the intention of preconception care use: lessons from a multi-ethnic urban population in the Netherlands.

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Determinants of the intention of preconception care use: lessons from a multi-ethnic urban population in the Netherlands.

Int J Public Health. 2013 Apr;58(2):295-304

Authors: Temel S, Birnie E, Sonneveld HM, Voorham AJ, Bonsel GJ, Steegers EA, Denktaş S

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the determinants of the intention of preconception care use of women in a multi-ethnic urban population.
METHODS: The ASE-model-a health behaviour model-was used as an explanatory framework. A representative sample was taken from the municipal population registers of two districts in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, 2009-2010. 3,225 women (aged 15-60 years) received a questionnaire, which was returned by 631: 133 Dutch, 157 Turkish and Moroccan, and 341 Surinamese and Antillean. Descriptive, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed.
RESULTS: The multiple logistic analyses showed that intention to attend preconception care was significantly higher in women with a Turkish and Moroccan background (β 1.02, P = 0.006), a higher maternal age (β 0.04, P = 0.008) and a positive attitude (β 0.50, P < 0.001). Having no relationship (β -1.16, P = 0.004), multiparity with previous adverse perinatal outcome (β -1.32, P = 0.001), a high educational level (β -1.23, P = 0.03), having paid work (β -0.72, P = 0.01) and experienced barriers level (β -0.15, P = 0.003) were associated with less intention to use preconception care.
CONCLUSIONS: Modifiable determinants as attitude and barriers can be addressed to enhance preconception care attendance.

PMID: 22871983 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Individual- and area-level effects on mortality risk in Germany, both East and West, among male Germans aged 65+

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Individual- and area-level effects on mortality risk in Germany, both East and West, among male Germans aged 65+

Int J Public Health. 2013 Jun 28;

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Clustering of health and risk behaviour in immigrant and indigenous Dutch residents aged 19-40 years.

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Clustering of health and risk behaviour in immigrant and indigenous Dutch residents aged 19-40 years.
Int J Public Health. 2012 Apr;57(2):351-61
Authors: Reijneveld SA, van Nieuwenhuijzen M, Klein Velderman M… Continue reading

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