Category Archives: Soc Sci Med

Educational gains in cause-specific mortality: Accounting for cognitive ability and family-level confounders using propensity score weighting.

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Educational gains in cause-specific mortality: Accounting for cognitive ability and family-level confounders using propensity score weighting.

Soc Sci Med. 2017 May 08;184:49-56

Authors: Bijwaard GE, Myrskylä M, Tynelius P, Rasmussen F

Abstract
A negative educational gradient has been found for many causes of death. This association may be partly explained by confounding factors that affect both educational attainment and mortality. We correct the cause-specific educational gradient for observed individual background and unobserved family factors using an innovative method based on months lost due to a specific cause of death re-weighted by the probability of attaining a higher educational level. We use data on men with brothers from the Swedish Military Conscription Registry (1951-1983), linked to administrative registers. This dataset of some 700,000 men allows us to distinguish between five education levels and many causes of death. The empirical results reveal that raising the educational level from primary to tertiary would result in an additional 20 months of survival between ages 18 and 63. This improvement in mortality is mainly attributable to fewer deaths from external causes. The highly educated gain more than nine months due to the reduction in deaths from external causes, but gain only two months due to the reduction in cancer mortality and four months due to the reduction in cardiovascular mortality. Ignoring confounding would lead to an underestimation of the gains by educational attainment, especially for the less educated. Our results imply that if the education distribution of 50,000 Swedish men from the 1951 cohort were replaced with that of the corresponding 1983 cohort, 22% of the person-years that were lost to death between ages 18 and 63 would have been saved for this cohort.

PMID: 28501020 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Comparing the effects of defaults in organ donation systems.

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Comparing the effects of defaults in organ donation systems.
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Apr;106:137-42
Authors: van Dalen HP, Henkens K
Abstract
The ability of patients in many parts of the wo… Continue reading

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Born at the right time? Childhood health and the business cycle.

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Born at the right time? Childhood health and the business cycle.
Soc Sci Med. 2014 May;109:35-43
Authors: Angelini V, Mierau JO
Abstract
We analyze the relationship between the state … Continue reading

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A person-centred segmentation study in elderly care: Towards efficient demand-driven care.

A person-centred segmentation study in elderly care: Towards efficient demand-driven care.
Soc Sci Med. 2014 May 10;113C:68-76
Authors: Eissens van der Laan MR, van Offenbeek MA, Broekhuis H, Slaets JP
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The mix matters: Complex personal networks relate to higher cognitive functioning in old age.

The mix matters: Complex personal networks relate to higher cognitive functioning in old age.
Soc Sci Med. 2014 May 9;
Authors: Ellwardt L, Van Tilburg TG, Aartsen MJ
Abstract
Stronger engagement of o… Continue reading

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Does loneliness mediate the relation between social support and cognitive functioning in later life?

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Does loneliness mediate the relation between social support and cognitive functioning in later life?

Soc Sci Med. 2013 Dec;98:116-24

Authors: …

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Process evaluation of a problem solving intervention to prevent recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders.

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Process evaluation of a problem solving intervention to prevent recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders.

Soc Sci Med. 2014 Jan;100:123-32

Authors: Arends I, Bültmann U, Nielsen K, van Rhenen W, de Boer MR, van der Klink JJ

Abstract
Common mental disorders (CMDs) are a major cause of sickness absence. Twenty to 30% of the workers who return to work after sickness absence due to CMDs experience recurrent sickness absence. We developed the Stimulating Healthy participation And Relapse Prevention (SHARP)-at work intervention, a problem solving intervention delivered by occupational physicians (OPs), to prevent recurrent sickness absence in this worker population in The Netherlands. A process evaluation was conducted alongside a cluster-randomised controlled trial to (1) evaluate whether the SHARP-at work intervention was implemented according to the protocol and differed from treatment in the control group, and (2) to investigate the relationship between the key elements of the intervention and the effect outcome (i.e. recurrent sickness absence). We collected process data for both the intervention and control group on recruitment, reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, context and satisfaction. Data on recurrent sickness absence was collected through the registry system of the collaborating occupational health service. The study was performed in the Netherlands, and between 2010 and 2012, 154 OPs and 158 participants participated. Compared to the control group, participants in the intervention group more frequently had two or more consultations with the OP (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-8.8) and completed more assignments (OR = 33.8, 95% CI = 10.4-109.5) as recommended in the intervention protocol. OPs and participants were satisfied with the intervention and rated it as applicable. Several individual intervention components were linked to the effect outcome. The process evaluation showed that the SHARP-at work intervention was conducted according to the protocol for the majority of the participants and well-received by OPs and participants. Furthermore, the intervention differed from treatment in the control group. Overall, the results provide support for implementing the intervention in practice.

PMID: 24444847 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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How teams use indicators for quality improvement – a multiple-case study on the use of multiple indicators in multidisciplinary breast cancer teams.

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How teams use indicators for quality improvement – a multiple-case study on the use of multiple indicators in multidisciplinary breast cancer teams.

Soc Sci Med….

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Social deprivation and adverse perinatal outcomes among Western and non-Western pregnant women in a Dutch urban population.

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Social deprivation and adverse perinatal outcomes among Western and non-Western pregnant women in a Dutch urban population.

Soc Sci Med. 2013 Apr;83:42-9

Authors: Poeran J, Maas AF, Birnie E, Denktas S, Steegers EA, Bonsel GJ

Abstract
Social deprivation is considered a key factor in adverse perinatal outcomes. Rotterdam, the second largest city in The Netherlands, has large inequalities in perinatal health and a high number of deprived neighbourhoods. Social deprivation is measured here through a composite variable: ‘Social Index’ (SI). We studied the impact of the SI (2008-2009; 5 categories) in terms of perinatal mortality, congenital anomalies, preterm birth, small for gestational age (SGA) and low 5-minute Apgar score as registered in The Netherlands Perinatal Registry (Rotterdam 2000-2007, n = 56,443 singleton pregnancies). We applied ethnic dichotomisation as Western (European/North-American/Australian) vs. Non-Western (all others) ethnicity was expected to interact with the impact of SI. Tests for trend and multilevel regression analysis were applied. Gradually decreasing prevalence of adverse perinatal outcomes was observed in Western women from the lowest SI category (low social quality) to the highest SI category (high social quality). In Western women the low-high SI gradient for prevalence of spontaneous preterm birth (per 1000) changed from 57.2 to 34.1, for iatrogenic preterm birth from 35.2 to 19.0, for SGA from 119.6 to 59.4, for low Apgar score from 10.9 to 8.2, and for perinatal mortality from 14.9 to 7.6. These trends were statistically confirmed by Chi2-tests for trend (p < 0.001). For non-Western women such trends were absent. These strong effects for Western women were confirmed by significant odds ratios for almost all adverse perinatal outcomes estimated from multilevel regression analysis. We conclude social deprivation to play a different role among Western vs. non-Western women. Our results suggest that improvements in social quality may improve perinatal outcomes in Western women, but alternative approaches may be necessary for non-Western groups. Suggested explanations for non-Western ‘migrant’ groups include the presence of ‘protective’ effects through knowledge systems or intrinsic resilience. Implications concern both general and targeted policies.

PMID: 23465203 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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The role of personal characteristics in the relationship between health and psychological distress among kidney transplant recipients.

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The role of personal characteristics in the relationship between health and psychological distress among kidney transplant recipients.

Soc Sci Med. 2012…

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